Gustave And Delacroix Analysis

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Gustave Courbet was a man interested in beauty no matter where he found it while Eugène Delacroix focused more on beauty in war and suffering. Both painters used color to enhance the authenticity of the the people in the images. As well as color, the painters used shadowing and it enhanced the mystery and seriousness of the paintings. Gustave and Eugène both painted pictures of characters that were surrounded by backgrounds that either enhanced them or the scene or the image in the back was blurred to emphasize the unimportance of everything except the characters. Emotion is also evident in both of their paintings. Gustave’s paintings contain raw emotion and natural settings. All of his paintings are real in the manner of the beautiful Irish …show more content…
He was in a relationship with Joanna Hiffernan and was inspired to paint the Origin of the World. Courbet was inspired by women and their bodies. Delacroix was inspired by other nations and their problems. But Gustave produced more paintings that were less oppressive and he also had less diversity in his paintings. Eugène produced images consisting of Greeks, Africans, and many other characters while Gustave produced more real images within his life. Both of their works consists of scenes that have meaning and importance to the people of the 19th century, but in different ways. Gustave was a very arrogant man that welcomed conflict and controversy. He refused to conform to the French society’s communist government and insisted on independence from any kind of government. Delacroix was famously known for more exotic extravagances that influenced his paintings. He believed that being magnificent is the only way to succeed. Eugène Delacroix believed that everything should be meaningful and inspirational. He once said, A picture is nothing but a bridge between the soul of the artist and that of the spectator.” Even the way he spoke was relevant and inspiring. Courbet was a man with rebellion and arrogance in his heart while Delacroix was a man made of elaboration and fines. These painters had such ingenuity and brilliance that they were unlike any other. Both painters influenced some of the most well known artists such as …show more content…
Neoclassicism focused on aristocratic Romans, Greeks, and Renaissance depictions. It consisted of paintings that were meant to entertain and represent the higher class of Europe. Romanticism was about relating to the middle class and emphasizing emotion and real characters. Both movements were made up of smooth lines, but characters were impersonal which is a stark contrast to the personality of all the characters portrayed in Romanticism. Impressionism was a movement made of visible strokes that symbolized certain things. This was a movement that consisted of many amazing artists like Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Éduoard Manet, and Paul Cèzanne. The difference between Impressionism and Romanticism was the brush strokes and the lack of emotion on the characters faces. Impressionism was more impersonal and full of landscapes. Post Impressionism was an art movement that decided to move towards more sentimental Impressionism. It was similar to Impressionism, but it wanted to become more personal. The movement produced famous artists such as Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Gauguin. Post Impressionism was different from Romanticism due to its still visible and disconnected which Romanticism was the complete opposite to the sleek, blended strokes associated with Romanticism and its painters. Expressionism was the 20th century movement towards distortion

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