Compare And Contrast The New Deal And The Great Society

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The New Deal and the Great Society were two of the most compelling political strategies introduced by a president. Franklin D. In 1932, Roosevelt set in motion the New Deal; his primary focus was known as the three R’s: relief, recovery, and reform. For recovery, Roosevelt focused on reorganizing the banking system; this included implementing a bank holiday, organizing the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and the Homeowners Loan Corporation. Reform, focused on changing systems to prevent something like the Great Depression from happening again; for example the Securities and Exchange Commission was put into action in 1934 in order to prevent the market from crashing. The third R, relief focused on lowering the unemployment rate and creating …show more content…
Regrettably, the short time between election and inauguration deteriorated the nation further. Weather, drought, and farmers shrinking markets inflicted significant damage on the economy. The economic decline forced groups to rally together and take a stance against inequality. An angry group from Iowa, the Farm Holiday Association formed and declared a thirty day prohibition on horticultural products with intentions to limit supply and drive up prices. This movement rapidly spread throughout the Midwest and other areas causing uproars such as farmers were setting up roadblocks in efforts to prevent hauling of products and others meddling with land evictions. Chaos broke out everywhere and to add fuel to the flame, the general public no longer trusted banking institutions for many reasons such as lack of deposit insurance. During this time, depositing money into banking accounts was deemed risky. On the off chance that a bank made terrible speculations and was compelled to close, people who did not withdraw their money quick enough ended up the creek without a paddle and by January 1932, what was left of the banking system had nearly been exhausted. In a time when the nation needed guidance, Hoover opted to not intervene. His lack of leadership forced banks from thirty-two states to shut their doors and halt all funding operations in efforts of preventing mass withdrawals. (Schaller …show more content…
In 1935, he introduced presented legislation to expand temporary work relief programs for the unemployed and to make a lasting economic security program. He also proposed expanding government financed work relief for the unemployed in which Congress replied by passing the Resettlement Administration; the Resettlement Administration directed provincial help exercises. Soon thereafter, Roosevelt 's organization proposed an arrangement for unemployment and disability insurance. The president relegated Labor Secretary Frances Perkins to oversee drafting the Social Security Act. She proposed a legislature regulated system supported by contributions from laborers and employers, not by tax revenue. (Schaller 898) It was not until the 1930s where Roosevelt began to establish relationship with labor unions. Up until then, the American Federation of Labor upheld its unity with the Republican Party. This change became effective when Congress passed the National Labor Relations Board, which empowered the rights of workers to form unions and to force employers to arrange work contracts with those unions. In 1935, unions representing industrial laborers created the Congress of Industrial Organizations and in doing as such, most associated unions acknowledged black and other minority workers. (Schaller 899)Roosevelt’s

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