Medical Model Of Disability

Improved Essays
The medical model of disability is a model which identifies the impairment of a disabled person as the problem, of which, the aim is to fix or cure this impairment by means of medical professionals whereas the social model of disability is a model which identifies that society creates barriers in the environment that do not allow disabled people from participating fully and equally to those who are able bodied and looking at ways that can remove these barriers for disabled people. This essay will thus further discuss the medical model of disability in contrast with the social model of disability and i will illustrate this by using materials such as case studies and academic references that relate to the medical model and social model of disability. …show more content…
When we are born the medical model of disability judges our quality of life,assuming that an impairment would make our lives not worth living. If the impairment is diagnosed after a disabled babies birth there is a desperate attempt to find a label by the medical professionals in order to find the right specialist to ‘fix’ or ‘cure’ the individual. The medical model assumes that all disabled people want to be ‘fixed’ for example in article 4 they now want to ensure deaf children develop speech by technological advances such as hearing aids and cochlear implants,they also want deaf children to be an environment where they can be educated from the start on how to listen and speak with their hearing peers, they feel that it is important because as stated in the article the spoken language is the basis for efficient reading and that by increasing access to sign language is not the answer to the problem of ‘fixing’ people with impairments ( Van De Merwe & Clark. 2009), however many disabled people do not see their an impairment as limiting or affecting their quality of life. The medical model of disability says people are disabled by their impairments and sees a disabled persons impairments as the individuals problem which is caused by a health condition therefore professional medical treatment is needed to create ‘cure’ to better or ‘fix’ the individuals life. Thus in the medical model the medical care is viewed as the main issue in order for the management of the disability.(The Models of Disability -Disabled world. 2015).The medical model looks at what is 'wrong' with the individual rather than the individuals needs, creating low expectations of the individual leading to the disabled individual losing their independence, choice and control. This is shown in article where one deaf school- leaver Robyn Swannack choice

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Introduction: In this report I am going to talk about the what the social and medical models of disability are, why they are important and my opinion on them. Models of disability are used for defining impairments and for helping the government and society help meet the needs of disabled people. They are helpful as they give people a better understanding of disabilities and the issues associated with having a disability. Social model of disability: The social model of disability says that disability is caused by the way society is organised rather than a persons difference or impairment. An impairment is a medical condition that leads to a disability.…

    • 941 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Having a disability means to have “a restriction… in performing an activity… considered normal for a human being” (Pharoah, 819). By saying that we should use genetic therapy to correct for disabilities, medical professionals are also saying that those living with those medical issues are living subpar. The medical model, the idea that disabilities are not good, “supports the correction of a biological condition through therapy…” and genetic therapy as well (Rulli). We should not say that the social consequences for people with disabilities that is created by using genetic therapy outweighs the medical benefits of genetic therapy for people who can treat their disabilities because, like in the medical model, health and medical issues should be the priority. The social model states that disability is only “bad for people in certain social contexts...” (Rulli) and we should not be seeking to correct these disabilities if the problems have already been fixed through other means.…

    • 1273 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Medical model of disability The social model of disability says that incapacity is caused by the way society is sorted out. The medical model of disability says individuals are disabled by their disabilities or contrasts. Under the medical model, these impedances or contrasts ought to be 'settled' or changed by medical and different medications, notwithstanding when the impairment or distinction does not cause agony or ailment. The medical model takes a gander at what is 'wrong' with the individual and not what the individual needs. It makes low desires and prompts individuals losing freedom, decision and control in their own particular lives.…

    • 1390 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Roy's Nursing Theory

    • 1083 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Disease generates the unknown and the ensuing stressful experiences hamper the development of adaptation. In such situations, an individual can only solve the problem and facilitate adaptation to the new condition by adopting a new identity with the disease as a focal point (Akyil & Ergüney, 2013). Coaching and teaching the families and patients can manipulate a patient’s adaptation to a disease process or diagnosis. An example would be speaking with a patient and their family regarding their chronic disease. Individuals facing a threatening diagnosis start looking for knowledge to interpret the disease in an objective fashion to learn to cope with it effectively (Akyil & Ergüney, 2013).…

    • 1083 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    You need to focus on the persons surrounding’s instead of the persons disability, “By person-centered care I refer specifically to becoming familiar with the patient’s personal situation in its crucial re-lationship to the source of illness.”, (Caring for Patients: A Critique of the Medical Model, Allen B. Barbour, November 30th 1995, p.1512). These models may be seen as disempowering, and as reinforcing rather than challenging social exclusion. The Medical Model of Disability The medical model is also known as a socio-political model. Sometimes, people like policy makers and managers think about disability in this individual way they are most likely going to concentrate their efforts on ‘compensating’ people with impairments for what is not right with their bodies by, for example, targeting ‘special’ benefits at them and providing segregated ‘special’ services for them. They tend to believe that ‘curing’ or at least managing the disability completely revolves around figuring out the illness or disability from an in-depth clinical perspective.…

    • 1090 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    While both approaches are attempting to improve the health and social standard of the person, the ideology behind them are fundamentally diverse. The medical model concentrates on the individual being the cause of the disability with an ‘ideology of normality’ which ‘aims to restore disabled person to normality’ (Oliver, 1990, p.4). In addition to being focused on the person, it sees the root cause within them and consequently is also referred to as individual model. Therefore, society’s attitude towards incapacity used to be overwhelmingly adverse. It is argued that up until today the medical dialogue remains forming negative connotations with incapacity and dissimilarity (Brittain, 2004).…

    • 1351 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    So more of K&S would question the natural process of being deaf like Lichy, and his wife is death. I think they would want the child to be deaf because of who is going to teach the child to talk. Also, an objection can be that couples can chose their embryos based on eyes and other characteristics, which should be placed on the same pedestal as choosing a deaf embryo. When a deaf embryo is selected when can think of it as child, family, society, and how other children view the child. When the embryo is selected for the child gets to live the best life possible for them.…

    • 911 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    My article is on health care and whether it should be a right or a privilege. The writer Brian C. Joondeph, MD argues that health care can and should be both a right and a privilege. He uses ethos, appealing to the readers emotions. He states that a family can have a child that has cancer and can't afford the care for them. Many readers would find this sad and it is one of the many reason people want health care as a right.…

    • 1529 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Furthermore, Pinky’s father mentioned that she should have been hospitalized if she had all these symptoms, but this did not happen. All of these mistakes discovered by the family was a product of the doctor rushing to determine the disease. Since the mother, being out of the system, took her time and attention, she was able provide better care for her daughter. Moreover, the mother-daughter tie of kinship should also be taken into consideration to understand biomedicine’s impersonal goals. In other words, the objectives of biomedicine illustrate the practitioners’ depersonalized care of their patient.…

    • 1949 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    It is important for health care professionals to attend to a patient’s psychological needs as well as biological needs. Including subjective language in addition to the medical objective jargon during patient encounters will help reduce the strict biomedical stance on the illness. In addition to this, modified attitudes toward AIDS patients can lead to improved health services to them. This can be solved by including education during training for healthcare professionals on the health implications of the stigma and how they can address them in a professional setting. It may be beneficial to create scenarios during healthcare training that depict interaction with an HIV/AIDS patient.…

    • 1492 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays