Compare And Contrast The Federalist And Strict Constructionists

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Register to read the introduction… He thought that a national bank would help to improve the nation’s credit. Jefferson and Madison were opposed due to that a national bank mainly benefited merchants and …show more content…
The Federalists chastised the idea of a draft because nowhere in the Constitution does it say that the Federal government has the right to do that. Jefferson says, “Some men look at constitutions with sanctimonious reverence, and deem them like the arc of the covenant, too sacred to be touched” (Document G). He basically says that loose constructionism is good. Changing the Constitution, or adding new bills is okay according to Jefferson in document G. The Jeffersonian Republicans started out as strict constructionists, but due to being in power, they became more and more …show more content…
Congress introduced the Alien and Sedition Acts in 1798 which was then argued against by the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions. The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions were political statements made by the Kentucky and Virginia legislatures that were drafted to argue that the states had the right to declare any acts of Congress as unconstitutional. By doing this, they argued for states’ rights and strict constructionism. Jefferson and Madison, both being from the Virginia legislature, also advocated states’ rights and strict constructionism. Jefferson then became president soon after and brought his ideas of strict constructionism into play. Near the end of his second term in 1808, Jefferson says to Samuel Miller, a minister, “Certainly no power to prescribe any religious exercise, or to assume authority in religious discipline, has been delegated to the general [federal] government. It must then rest with the states...” (Document B). Jefferson clearly states that the states have the right to religion. Jefferson also says to Gideon Granger, “Our country is too large to have all its affairs directed by a single government” (Document A). Jefferson wants a small federal government to give more power to the states. Both these statements back up the initial idea of the Jeffersonians of strict constructionism and giving more rights to the states. Just like Jefferson’s thinking, when Madison was

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