Compare And Contrast The Color Of Organic Food

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The True Colors of Organic Food The word “organic” refers to the way farmers grow and process their products to follow specific standards regulated by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The purpose of organic farming is to restrain the amount of synthetic chemicals used to fertilize foods (although certain approved pesticides may be used) and reduce environmental pollution by relying on sustainable techniques to enhance the natural features of a farm. Although the research available does not provide enough evidence on their nutrient composition, to remark there is an advantage for a better health, the demand for organically grown food is increasing, and organic farming is revolutionizing the food industry in today’s society. …show more content…
Research from Stanford University analyzed about 250 studies measuring the dissimilarities between organic and conventional food nutrients in products like vegetables, fruits and more. Other than slightly higher acid levels in organic products and omega-3 in organic milk and chicken they were little nutrient differences between both products (Watson), so it is clear that organic and conventional vegetables offer similar levels of nutrients, including minerals, vitamin C and vitamin E. On the other hand, it is hard to compare the nutritional value of organic vs. conventional products because the soil, climate, and the time of harvest affect the composition of the produce. All produce -including organic- loses nutrients the longer they are in a supermarket or sitting on the farmer’s market after they are harvested. Similarly, there is no evidence that cows that are given hormones (BGH) produce contaminated milk or impacts human health (Lu and Silverstein). Even though organic food consumers believe that by consuming these products, they are healthier than those who consume conventional food; such a theory is wrong. Knapp remarks that “According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), in 1996, the last year for which data is available, 36% of people suffering from E. coli infection contracted it from organic …show more content…
Health wise, they have little to nothing to offer; economically, they are out of range for many American households. Organic products were usually found in health food stores, now is a regular food found at the supermarket and is creating guilt on the people that cannot afford to buy them. Consumers who buy organic products agree that paying more for them is a trade-off they make to be healthier (Lu and Silverstein). Conversely, families that do not have the budget to pay for organic products question if they are really worth the price (Lu and Silverstein).In her article, Watson emphasized that “is a controversy that’s been going on for a long time” between consumers. It is really a personal choice but food does not have to be organic to be safe, healthy and environmentally friendly. Even if some people opt to buy organic foods to reduce their pesticide intake they do not have to substitute their entire diet or change it all; likewise, pesticides can be avoided by washing conventional produce with a mixture of water and a dishwashing soap before eating them (Watson). In addition, the Environmental Working Group releases two different lists every year to inform consumers about pesticide content in products. The “Dirty Dozen” that acknowledges the food with the highest pesticide concentration and the “Clean 15” that lists the food with the lowest pesticides. These lists give consumers the source they

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