Compare And Contrast Taming Of The Shrew And 10 Things I Hate About You

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Shakespeare 's play “Taming of the Shrew” and the 1990’s film, 10 Things I Hate About You,both aim to reflect the common ideas of- relationships, feminism, appearance verus reality and transformation. However, the context and intended audience of both texts forces varied representations and interpretations of these ideas. The use of film techniques and modern day music are used in 10 Things to appeal to a modern audience, while Taming of the Shrew is represented using literary techniques. 10 Things I Hate About You is set in a 1990’s high school and follows a stronger feminist approach to cater to a modern audience. However, both the play and the film portray a society where outspoken and aggressive women are deemed “shrewd” and undesirable. …show more content…
The play and the film both explore the idea of relationships, however, 10 Things I Hate About You explores a 20th century take on the dynamics of teenage relationships rather than marriage. While representations of relationships differ, both texts portray the idea of superficial relationships. Bianca in the film is as shallow and manipulative as she is portrayed in the play. Appearance is important to Bianca. This is evident when Cameron confronts her by saying “Have you always been this selfish?” The use of dialogue reinforcing that Bianca has broken Cameron 's heart due to her self-absorbed personality. In the play, Bianca is sought after by a variety of suitors, she is accused by Kate of being shallow when she says- “You fancy riches more,” implying that Bianca is deceitful and shallow. In the film, Bianca is characterised as popular and beautiful, and therefore her social status higher than that of her admirers. The quote said by Cameron,- “I burn, I pine, I perish” is a reference to Lucentio’s line in Taming of the Shrew , and this reinforces through the use of …show more content…
Katherine’s final soliloquy is presented as a gesture of obedience, but still follows the same idea of transformation. In her final soliloquy, she says, “Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper,” indicating her attempts to appeal to her male audience as she is transformed into an obedient and silent wife. Kat 's transformation is communicated through her choice of costuming. As she reads her poem, she is wearing stereotypical feminine clothing, contrasting with her appearance in previous scenes. Her soliloquy is similar to an apology as she states- “I hate the way I don 't hate you...not even at all,” representing her transformation. The representation of the taming process in both texts differs. In the film, Kat reads a soliloquy to communicate her transformation. Her choice is costuming contrasts with her clothing of previous scenes, as it is feminine and white to communicate transformation. In both texts, it is left ambiguous to the audience as to whether or not both women have truly been transformed, or if they have just modified themselves to appeal to their

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