Compare And Contrast Rooseveles Lindbergh's Speech

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In the first months of 1941, the American citizens were debating the positive and negatives points of intervention in the European War. Hitler was gaining strength. Those advocating intervention and those who opposed it gave speeches throughout the country. A comparison of President Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, Charles Lindbergh’s speech, on May 23, 1941, in New York, and Joseph Kennedy’s speech on January 6, 1941, show the divisive views of Americans war and post-war expectations and their inability to compromise. During this debate, no one could foresee the events ending 1941. In his State of the Union address on Jan. 6, 1941, President Franklin Roosevelt called for the freedom of speech and religion, freedom from …show more content…
They should not listen to men who argue for isolationism and appeasement, and they should be wary of men who get rich on wars. Roosevelt reminds citizens that Hitler is unlikely to invade the United States, and as long as the Axis powers are the aggressors, they have the upper hand. Roosevelt laid out the American Government’s responsibilities. First, they must commit to a national defense. Second, they must support nations who are fighting aggression. Lastly, they must not take an easy peace or appease the aggressors in an attempt to keep the nation out of conflicts. Roosevelt asked the nation for an increase in the readiness of the army and navy and production of war supplies. Roosevelt asked Congress for money and the presidential power to put the country on a war footing and assist the British. In February 1941, Winston Churchill, in a radio broadcast speech, said, “Give use the tools and we will finish the job.”( Source) This request bolstered Roosevelt’s position on aiding the allies. Roosevelt states, even though, the allies may not be in a position to repay the United States, it is still the moral thing to do, and it is in America’s best interest. He acknowledges the allies’ resistance was giving the United States time to upgrade their defenses. Americans must give aid in this emergency and must make sacrifices, if necessary. Everyone has a stake and a duty in the defense …show more content…
He states that America is not ready for war and would have great difficulty invading nations an ocean away. Axis armies are too large, and battle hardened for the United States to defeat them on their surf. He asked that Americans set an example for the world by peacefully spreading democracy. According to Lindbergh’s testimony on Feb. 6, 1941 before the Senate foreign affairs committee, Lindbergh did not believe the British could win the war. He thought America’s involvement would only prolong the war and increase the destruction in Europe. The only advantage he noted to aiding the allies was that the United States would gain valuable time to build its defenses. He argued that sending war supplies to England, such as planes, strained America’s ability to defend itself. Lindbergh and The America First Committee, also, objected to the Lend-Lease Bill Congress was debating during this same period. (Source) One good point Lindbergh made was, if the nation intervened in Europe and the Pacific, it would create a need to protect supply lines and sea-lanes from Germany and Japan air attacks. He stressed that the nation was not capable of this undertaking at that time. Lindbergh was blunt in his speeches and riled many Americans. He made trouble for the America First Committee in 1941, but he gave the organization an American hero, and

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