Compare And Contrast Meodaid And Medicare

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Medicare and Medicaid are two programs funded by the federal government that provide health insurance benefits to people 65 or older, individuals with certain specific disabilities, and people with extremely low incomes. Income requirements for the program can vary from state to state, but most of them are based on federal poverty guidelines. Because they cover some vision expenses, these programs fall under vision insurance plans.

In 2010, the maximum annual income for an individual to qualify for Medicaid was $10,830, while the income for a family of four was limited to $22,050. These numbers are higher in Hawaii and Alaska.

Vision insurance coverage offered under Medicare and Medicaid plans can vary from state to state. While eye injuries

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