Compare And Contrast Humanistic And Behaviorism

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Behavioral and humanistic approaches both have ways of helping us to understand and treat abnormal behaviors. Behaviorism and humanistic are similar because both concepts are about understanding why we as humans do the things that we do and what causes us to do the things that we do. Mentality comes into play when both approaches are studied. Behaviorism and humanistic differ more than that they are similar though.
Behaviorism
Behaviorism is based on the assumptions that behavior is learned and that behavior can be changed. Learning through conditioning such as classical and operant is another focus of behaviorism. Behaviorism also focuses on what can be observed. “Behaviorism believes that stimuli and an individual’s environment play an important part of how someone behaves (Nolen-Hoeksema,
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46). It was developed by Carl Rogers who believed in the enhancement of self-acceptance and personal growth within a positive environment (O’Donohue & Kitchener, 2006). This method is used to treat anxiety, depression and various other problems. This therapy has helped some and not others.
Comparison and Contrast Behaviorism and humanistic are based on assumptions. They both deal with human behaviors on various levels. Free will is thrown into play in both behaviorism and humanistic. Behaviorism has no use for free will unlike humanism that does. Humanism rejects the possibility of scientific aspects and behaviorism embraces it.
The environment plays a factor in both behaviorism and humanistic. Innate importance is the focus in the humanistic approach and it has no significance in behaviorism. Behaviorism stresses that people are the way that they are because of their environment. Hence, the phrase, ‘a product of the environment.’ The humanistic approach believes people are the way that they are because they want the good to be showing in everyone and everything.

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