Similarities Between Grendel And Frankenstein

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When one is asked to think of their idea of a monster, they usually come up with something along the lines of no emotions, no remorse, and pure disgust. On the contrary, two prominent novels in literature, Grendel by John Gardner and Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, claim that monsters can indeed show emotions and the ability to reason as a normal human being. Both novels introduce a physically hideous monster on the outside, isolated from the rest of the world. These two creatures are shown to have the capabilities to think, feel, react, and reason as the novel progresses, which conflicts with the animalistic notions of a generic monster. Due to the fact that the original story of Beowulf was written long before Frankenstein came out, some people will say that Shelly used Grendel’s characteristics to inspire the creation of Frankenstein’s monster. Grendel connects to Frankenstein in the way that both monsters experience loneliness from being isolated from society, acceptance of their wicked and inescapable purpose in life, and a …show more content…
At the end of the novel, Victor Frankenstein dies due to an illness he obtained while trying to find the monster. The monster soon finds out and mourns over his death, realizing that he has become an instrument of violence and destruction and deeply regrets what he has caused. The monster then goes off into the woods to promptly end his own life. This parallels with Grendel as he also faces true reality before his ultimate death. In the past, Grendel has always done whatever he wanted with no limits or repercussions. At the end of his life, Grendel’s actions hinders himself in a real battle against Beowulf. Grendel faces death and “[knows] in advance that [he] can’t win. [He stands] baffled, quaking with fear...” (Gardner 173). Ironically, both monsters’ change their emotions from apathy to genuine fear and

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