Compare And Contrast E. B Dubois And Langston Hughes

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D.E.B Dubois and Langston Hughes fight for Racial Equality Protest is a way of doing an act to be heard or acknowledged with something people disagree with. Throughout history many African American protested through literature. D.E.B Dubois and Langston Hughes are African American authors who have famous works that have gotten attention though the work of literature. These two authors have a lot of the same beliefs and has made a big impact of the African American culture. The two works I’m going to be talking about are “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain” and “The Souls of Black Folk”. The type of racial inequalities African Americans faced during the twentieth century.
Differences in schooling are a key factor in the debate on racial
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Dubois was born on February 23, 1868 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Dubois acquired two bachelor’s degrees and a master’s degree and lastly a doctorate degree, the first bachelor degree is from Fisk University in 1888 and finished his education at Harvard University by 1895. W. E. B. Du Bois considered black literature to be an essential tool in the race uplift project of the New Negro Movement (Barnard, Emily, 2005). One of his most popular work is “The Souls of Black Folk” and this book talked about the color line, the veil, double conciseness, and African Americans on going racial inequalities, in the twentieth century. D.E.B Dubois argued that because of the laws and the society that are set for blacks prevents blacks from achieving equality which is known as the color line. The color line represents that because of blacks identify stops blacks from opportunity. An example of this is if you’re a black kid they wouldn’t receive the same education has a white kid. Which means that its stopping blacks from getting a better opportunity in life. The veil represents that because of racism whites find it hard to consider blacks as true Americans. Finally, double conciseness represents the feeling that black’s identity is divided into different parts making it hard to have one unified identity. This …show more content…
These African American literary writers have made an impact on the way our society view racial inequality. Langston Hughes is a famous poet who will be remembered forever and has made an effective impact on the African American society but I feel like D.E.B Dubois has made an even bigger impact. I feel like D.E.B Dubois stands out more in society because of his accomplishments in his work and through his life. The book “The Souls of Black Folk” really sends a strong message to its readers with the terms he uses such has the color line, the veil, and double conciseness. Not only does his book stand out but his strong background with a PhD degree from Harvard University and him becoming the leader in the Niagara Movement in 1905 and him helping form the National Association for the Advancement of Colored

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