Compare And Contrast Capote And Findley

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Both authors, Capote and Findley, are similar in their constructive use of point of view. In their novels the literary technique is utilized to illustrate their protagonist accordingly to their theme which subsequently aids in enhancing the themes portrayal to the reader. However, the authors demonstrate opposing methods at applying this technique due to them emphasizing on opposing thematic details in their work to achieve a successful portrayal of their differing themes. Therefore, there are similarities and contrasts that are exhibited in their utilization of point of view, notably perceived through dramatic irony, multiple perspectives and the establishment of heroism in plot to ultimately achieve a meaningful construction of their theme …show more content…
Although Capote discloses his novel as non-fiction, however, with the addition to utilizing multiple perspectives, it becomes eventually distinguishable the questionable bias Capote has towards the protagonist, Perry. The notion of Capote’s bias is supported by the point of view scarcely ever transitioning to Dick’s as opposed to Perry’s, which occurs frequently. But while considering the non-fictional actions that Capote’s tragic hero, Perry, committed, it is reasonably justified for Capote to resort to incorporating in his own bias by purposefully selecting information about the case that corresponds with his own personal perspective. Therefore, the utilization of bias is an ultimate result of Capote’s leading intention being to construct Perry’s character to resemble a tragic hero, similarly to Findley’s additional attempt with his protagonist, Robert. However, Findley, in a contrasting manner when compared to Capote, does not employ point of view to articulate his novel’s protagonist as a hero, he instead structures the novel to resemble the hero’s journey to invoke a semblance of pity in the reader. Therefore, a palpable transformation in the character of Robert is necessary due to its correspondence with the hero’s journey and ultimately its establishment of Findley’s perception of the spiritual effects of war, whilst, accordingly, not …show more content…
By both novels exemplifying a multitude of point of views, it allows freedom for a reader to analyze the perspectives of surrounding characters to either enhance the protagonist or to restrict the readers reach to them. Thus, the novel's attitudes and ultimate theme are constructed by the point of view by directing the reader to correspond with the perspective that the author is portraying. Capote's non-fiction novel exhibits this technique of utilizing point of view to persuade his bias on readers by him displaying both characters, Perry and Dick, in an opposing approach. The characters are juxtaposed with each other to ultimately help heighten Capote's theme of Perry being an example of a tragic hero by implying that the court system is corrupt in not further identifying Perry's mental stability. Findley correspondingly implements point of view in his novel to articulate his perspective on the wide-spread effect that war has on individuals whilst inserting his contrasting notion on life being eternal. Point of view helps enhance his perspective to an extreme degree by constructing his story in a non-linear point of view with addition to demonstrating the confusion that accompanies war in any individual that has any semblance of involvement

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