Compare And Contrast Byzantine And Caliphates

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The postclassical era is most often described by historians as the era during which networks of communication and exchange based on trade and human migration are more distinct, a more evident shift to monotheistic world religions exist, and a greater spread of “civilization” to additional regions of the world comes into play. It was around this time period when the Byzantine Empire and the Islamic Caliphates would come into existence. The Byzantine Empire, whose name is derived from a modest market town and fishing village known as Byzantion, was located in the eastern Mediterranean; while the empire of the Islamic Caliphates arose in the Arabian Peninsula. The Byzantine Empire, influenced by Christianity, and the Islamic Caliphates, influenced …show more content…
However, even though the two empires share some similarities, the Islamic Caliphates based their legal system off Sharia Law, while the Byzantine Empire’s legal system was based off of their Roman predecessors. Religion has always been a prominent aspect of growing societies and the Byzantine Empire and the Islamic Caliphates, understanding this fact, instate their respective religion as their empire’s major religion. In 330 CE the Roman Emperor Constantine recognized the strategic importance of the town Byzantion, located in the eastern Mediterranean, and decided that the location would serve as the new imperial capital. Constantine, being the first Christian emperor, claimed sanction and divine favor for his rule. Constantine would intervened in theological disputes and used his political position to support the views he considered orthodox, while condemning those though which were heretical to him. Through this he initiated a policy know as caesaropapism. This policy meant that the emperor was not only a secular lord but also played an active and prominent role in ecclesiastical affairs. Due to this fact, the empire became politically and culturally …show more content…
The Byzantine Empire was originally part of the Roman Empire, so when the empire fell and divided into east an west, the east became known as the Byzantine Empire. Due to this, the new empire was more of a continuation of the fallen Roman Empire, and a result, the empire legal system had been influenced by their Roman predecessors. This can be seen under Emperor Justinian, a Byzantine emperor. Justinian was responsible for the codification of Roman law. He ordered a systematic review of Roman law and issued the Corpus iris civilis, which was immediately recognized. Due to this fact, the Byzantine Empire drew it’s legal system from the Roman’s. Compared to this, the Islamic Caliphate’s legal system was solely based on Sharia Law, or Islamic Holy Law. Sharia Law offered a detailed guidance on proper behavior in almost every aspect of life. Legal scholars and jurists drew inspiration from the Quran and teachings of Muhammad to create the Sharia. This would be more than a religious doctrine, it would become the system which dedicated marriage, family life, inheritance, slavery, business and commercial relationships, political authority, and crime. As a result, crime and the punishments associated with them were determined by religion. Thus, unlike the Byzantine Empire whose legal system drew from the fallen Roman Empire’s and developed it, the Islamic Caliphate

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