Compare And Contrast Assisted Death And Euthanasia

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You 're lying in a hospital bed. Your body motionless due to the heavy pain medication, you 've been like this for what seems like forever. The only people that come to see you anymore are the nurses that take care of your body. Are you even alive anymore? Surprisingly enough this is how some terminally ill patients spend their final days. California Medical Association board concludes that “despite the remarkable medical breakthroughs we’ve made and the world-class hospice or palliative care we can provide, it isn’t always enough”. After all treatments have tried and failed; what is left? In many states there is no other option; you are left to ride it out until the end of your life. At this time, four states in America have passed a law allowing …show more content…
The main difference is who administers the lethal dose to end a patient’s life. Euthanasia is where a physician performs the act that ends a patient’s life; whereas assisted death is a way to let a patient perform the act themselves and the physician aids solely in writing the prescription. In general, assisted death is viewed in a more positive light than euthanasia attributing to the person administering the lethal dose. Euthanasia is illegal in all of the United States while assisted suicide is now legal in Oregon, Washington, Montana, and California. Each state has their own regulations that are generally alike to ensure a patient is eligible. The main regulation within the Death with Dignity Act requires a patient to be diagnosed terminally ill to even be considered. A terminal illness is defined as a disease that cannot be cured and that will end a person’s life in a short period of time. Assisted death law specifically requires this time to be six months; a seemingly long time to some but for a person experiencing this, it can seem like …show more content…
“Evidence shows that these conversations are far more likely to reassure a dying person rather than to direct them toward making a request for medical aid in dying” (Jackson). As well as the main requirement of being terminally ill, each state also requires that a patient make three separate requests for assisted death, two oral requests and one written. Each oral request must be at least fifteen days apart. This ensures a patient with enough anticipation to be sure the request is the right decision for themselves. Additionally, physicians are required to reiterate the option of palliative and hospice care. As stated previously, palliative and hospice care can be useful options for patients in less extreme

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