Compare And Contrast A Rose For Emily And Abner Snopes

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In “Barn Burning” and “A Rose for Emily,” William Faulkner shows that the characters of Miss Emily and Abner Snopes are from different backgrounds but they both are compelled to commit horrible crimes. Miss Emily from “A Rose for Emily” and Abner Snopes from “Barn Burning” seem like very different characters at first glance. However, they both have inclinations that lean toward the violent and sinister when things do not go their way. Miss Emily resorts to murder when her suitor attempts to leave her. Abner Snopes takes revenge on people he feels have wronged him by burning down their barns. Both “A Rose for Emily” and “Barn Burning” are representations of the changing south. Although Miss Emily and Abner Snopes are examples of characters …show more content…
Abner is well known in the community, most people consider him rude and hateful. Unlike Emily, Abner is a low class tenant farmer, who does not have much money and resents people who do. He and his family live in small shacks, not much better than what slaves live in. One of Abner’s daughters remarks as they pull their wagon up to their latest house, “Likely hit ain’t fitten for hawgs.” (Faulkner, “Barn” 483) Abner is a harsh man, even to his own family. He doesn’t try to be accepted because he doesn’t care to be. Abner rejects societal values and establishes this by not fighting for either side in the …show more content…
Faulkner portrays Emily as a lonely woman who was living alone in a time when people were conservative and prejudiced. Should this make the reader feel sorry for her? Emily might deserve a little sympathy, if for no other reason than she is clearly insane. She has no family or friends to get her the help that she so obviously requires. On the other hand, Abner warrants absolutely no sympathy from readers. A Teacher 's Companion to Accompany American Short Stories defends Abner’s crimes by stating, “His acts of rebellion can and have been seen as strikes against an oppressive power structure.” (Hitchcock 68) Faulkner tries to blame the community in some part for his

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