Community Participation Case Study

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Register to read the introduction… For the state, it appears that the main aim of community participation programmes is less about improving conditions for the poor or to modifying forms of decision-making, than maintaining existing power relations in society and ensuring the silence of the poor. Community participation is often used by governments as a means of legitimizing the political system and as a form of social control. The level of commitment by many governments to community participation has often been dubious or extremely limited. Formal channels of community participation have not always generated major benefits for local communities (Constantino-David, 1982, p. 190; Gilbert and Ward, 1984, pp. 770–780; Morgan, 1993, p. 6; Rahman, 1993, p. 226). Participation is often constrained at the state level by partisanship, funding limitations, rigidity, the resistance of local and national bureaucrats, and the state’s inability to respond effectively to the felt needs of the populace (Morgan, 1993, p. 6). Government bureaucrats as the instruments of nation states are very much in a hierarchical mode of thinking which inhibits participatory development and undermines the people’s own governing abilities (Rahman, 1993, p. 226). 1.3 The over-reporting of development successes Another problem is that …show more content…
Thus, creating and strengthening adequate social organisation – the social capital that sustains, uses and maintains the technology, and involving the users of the technology, is no less important than the technology itself’ (Cernea, 1983, p. 13; 1994, p. …show more content…
Facilitators should never come with ready-made solutions or tell the people what to do, they must rather encourage and assist people to think about their problems in their own way. Besides advice and guidance, this can be done by stimulating self-investigation and reflection among the poor; by stimulating them to take their own decisions and action, and to review and evaluate themselves. The consultant should be involved with a community only for as long as it takes to identify real needs and transfer necessary skills and ideas to ensure that the community people can run programmes themselves. In communities where people are not yet aware of their own potential, or have not been allowed to express and develop it, a dependent relationship could often emerge which could impede the release of a community’s own initiatives and collective

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