Significant Achievements In Community Health

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Significant Achievements in Community Health Probably the most widely known and impressive achievements in community health were done on a national scale. During the first 10 years of the 20th century, the United States made major advancements on multiple health fronts. They are called the “Ten Great Public Health Achievements” ("CDC", 2011). Though public health and community health are not used interchangeably, it is without question that because of the national health advances it created macro-changes resulting in micro-changes in the communities allowing for healthier living among the populations. Below is stated each achievement in further detail that are not ranked in any specific order. First in the discussion are vaccinations. …show more content…
The greatest advancement among this population is the drastically reduced numbers of infants born with neural tube defects. This is mainly due to the fact that the federal government requires cereal grain products to be fortified with folic acid and community health campaigns have encouraged “women of childbearing age to make sure they get the recommended amounts of folic acid” ("CDC", 2011). Over the past decade, the U.S. has seen a massive savings in healthcare costs related to lowering the rates folic acid deficiency birth defects of approximately $4.6 …show more content…
are improved occupational safety, prevention of childhood lead poisoning and improved public health preparedness and response. Working conditions have considerably improved during the last ten years. A good example of improved occupational safety among healthcare workers was the increased education on patient lifting that has lowered the number of reported back injuries by 35 percent. During the 1980’s, the percentage of children with elevated blood lead levels was estimated to be around 88.2 percent ("CDC", 2011). With extensive lead poisoning prevention laws in 23 states, the percentage of lead poisonings fell to under 1 percent of children nationwide by 2010. Much progress has been made in public emergencies and disease outbreaks since the terrorist attack on the nation in 2001 and Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Federal, state and local agencies are bettered prepared to handle attacks, disease outbreaks, and severe

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