Communism In The Soviet Union

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Communism is based on Marxism, an ideology created by sociologist Karl Marx in the 1840s. Communism is an economic and social system in which property and resources are not owned by individuals but by a classless society. One of the more interesting forms of communism was formed in the United States of Soviet Russia during the 1900s. Communism in the Soviet Union started in 1912, where the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU) was developed and led by Vladimir Lenin. The CPSU rose to power in the aftermath of the Russian Revolution of 1917. The party was formalized under Joseph Stalin, who led the party to pursue state socialism, where the industries throughout the Soviet Union were nationalized and a planned economy was implemented. …show more content…
In 1931, his speech delivered at the First All-Union Conference of Leading Personnel of Socialist Industry, known as “The Tasks of Economic Executives”, outlined the various motivations for rapid industrializations in the USSR. He starts out by stating production output in the USSR in 1930, increased 25 percent as compared to other years but the people were promised an increase in production output of 31 to 32 percent increase. The managers and leading personnel of our industries now promise to increase industrial output in 1931 by 45 percent. Stalin mentions that two obtain these numbers there are two fundamental conditions that have to be met. The first condition is to have a realistic or “objective” possibilities. The second condition is for the willingness and ability to direct our enterprises in such a way as to realize these …show more content…
He faced many people that had doubted the policy but now that it has been executed many fear the USSR. According to the opinion of the Financial Times, "The progress made in machine construction cannot be doubted, and the celebrations of it in the press and on the platform, glowing as they are, are not unwarranted. It must be remembered that Russia, of course, produced machines and tools, but only of the simplest kind. True, the importation of machines and tools is actually increasing in absolute figures; but the proportion of imported machines to those of native production is steadily diminishing. Russia is producing today all the machinery essential to her metallurgical and electrical industries; has succeeded in creating her own automobile industry; has established her own tool-making industry from small precision instruments to the heaviest presses; and in the matter of agricultural machinery is independent of foreign imports. At the same time, the Soviet Government is taking measures to prevent the retardation of production in the output of such basic industries as iron and coal endangering the fulfilment of the plan in four years. The one thing certain is that the enormous plants now being established guarantee a very considerable increase in the output of the heavy industries." In his 1933 Report Delivered at the Joint Plenum of the

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