Common Sense Anne Bradstreet Analysis

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Thomas Paine’s pamphlet, Common Sense, is a work that shows how many people felt during the late 1700’s. In this work, Paine advocates independence from Great Britain to the Thirteen Colonies. It was published anonymously during the beginning of the American Revolution, and instantly became a sensation among the colonists. Similarly, Anne Bradstreet’s poem, Here Follow Some Verses Upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666, portrays major Puritan beliefs of the 1600’s. Anne Bradstreet’s poem exemplifies the Puritanical beliefs of simplicity, providential view of history, and the insignificance of worldly possessions. Anne Bradstreet believed that God was directly involved in the actions of nations and individuals. This “providential view …show more content…
When passing the property where her house once stood, she remembers all of her “pleasant things that in ashes lie”. She can not help but to feel sorrow over the lost memories and belongings. Bradstreet creates a sense of loneliness by stating, “Under thy roof no guest shall sit, Nor at thy table eat a bit”, which causes the reader to feel empathy for the author. While grieving the loss of her property, she revisits the places where she would sit, and where she had her furniture. However, she knows that these objects did not give extreme joy, only a subtle amusement. Anne Bradstreet says, “Adieu, Adieu, all’s vanity”, and tells herself that the burning of her house doesn’t matter and that her real house is Heaven, which can not burn. She chides herself saying, “Then straight I ‘gin my heart to chide, And did thy wealth on earth abide”, and realizes that all of her previous belongings were vanity, worthless, and excessive. Her realization of immoderate possessions leads her to become an ordained Puritan woman who understands that everything she owns really belongs to …show more content…
The theory of predestination states that people are preordained to eternal life and others are damned, and there is nothing a person can to do change this. When Anne became sad over the loss of her possessions, she reminded herself that, “Thou hast an house on high erect, Framed by that mighty Architect”. She knows that her old house is irrelevant compared to what awaits her in Heaven, and that life on Earth is simple and is not our true home. As she continues to illustrate the perfect “house” of God, she returns her attention to religion and faith. She states that, “There’s wealth enough, I need no more”, to show that she is happy with her current position in life and that she doesn’t need all of her old belongings. Anne knows all worldly possessions are temporary, and that they can not bring one true joy. She states that, “My hope and treasure lies above”, and knows that God is the only thing she needs to move forward in her life. Anne Bradstreet’s poem, Here Follow Some Verses Upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666, demonstrates the very basis of Puritan beliefs. Throughout the story, Anne transitions from a woman who did not focus on her faith, to one who was optimistic about her house burning down. She was happy to be able to focus more on God, and less on materialistic items that took away from the simple life that Puritans were supposed to live. Anne Bradstreet’s story shows that

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