Immigration In Charles Mann's 'The Trip' Cross The Pond

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The Trip 'Cross the Pond
“In 2013, approximately 41.3 million immigrants lived in the United States, an all-time high for a nation historically built on immigration. The United States remains a popular destination attracting about 20 percent of the world 's international migrants, even as it represents less than 5 percent of the global population.” (Jie Zong, Jeanne Batalova lines 8-13). Despite the high rates of immigration to America nowadays, back in colonial times the migration rates were dramatically decreased. However, no matter what era it is, new settlers will always have an effect on the native population. The new settlers of the Americas are just one example of leaving impacts on native populations. There are many works depicting the changes caused by settlers, two instances of these appear in the works "Of Plymouth Plantation" by William Bradford, and in Charles Mann 's work "The Coming of the Dawnland." The Colonists changed things in America such as political and social interactions, as well as agriculture and other food based activities.
When the Europeans came to North America, they affected how Indians reacted to white people by creating an alliance, but also changing their basic home lives. One of the first groups in America were the Puritans. They set up a strong alliance with
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This is evident in the interactions between new white settlers and the Native Americans. The Europeans affected the Americans by striking up alliances, thereby making stronger fighting forces through allies. The Europeans also changed the makeup of Native American societies. Trade wise, the Europeans received help from the Americans make them more open as well as bring in new goods to New England and the like through trade. Just cultures mix today from our wide range of immigrants, cultures mixed in the past from the meeting of the New and Old

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