Columbus Discovery Of The Americas Research Paper

1172 Words 5 Pages
If a foreigner came to your land, claimed it as theirs, reaped it of all it’s resources, and killed off millions of your kind either directly, through wars and pillaging, or indirectly, through diseases and alien animals, would you be complacent at all with them being praised as a hero of their time? In this paper, reasons why Columbus’ discovery of the Americas did not make the world a better place will be explained. Native Americans were killed in the millions, alien plants and animals wiped out native foliage and game, and with the sudden boom of sugar, tobacco, and cotton plantations, slave demand grew exponentially. One excellent example of why Columbus’ discovery of the Americas had a negative impact was the immense decimation of Native …show more content…
Although much of the plants and livestock that was brought over helped balance the diets of both Native Americans and Europeans, a significant amount contributed to decimation of indigenous foliage and wildlife. Most animals and plants that were brought over ended up being introduced by accident, a few times backfiring on colonists as well. In one occasion, some stow away black rats made it to the New World and almost took out an entire colony! Not only did they have a very destructive nature, they also carried many diseases, like the black plague and typhus. But rats weren’t the only animals causing such devastation. Seemingly innocent livestock such as sheeps, cows, and pigs either brought over horrendous illnesses or invaded farms to eat maze and other native …show more content…
As slaves were brought over from Africa, they had to count on sheer luck and hope they ended up on a ship with a Captain that fed them well. Some of them only packed the least amount of food possible to save money, even if much of the Africans aboard died of starvation. Others would pack copious amounts of food, believing that the healthier the slaves the better they would sell for. Generally, the Dutch would feed their slaves somewhat decent food three times a day, the French cook a stew of oats daily, and English ships would feed their cargo small tubes of fat twice a day. Depending on who the slave was bought by, these meal conditions may change or stay the same for them, while Native Americans often had to hunt for what game was left or struggle to get food for

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