Colorism And Ethnicity

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In 1970, the United States government came up with the word to describe a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin regardless of race. This is a word we are all familiar with when it comes to referring to this group of people. This word is “Hispanic.” At the present time, the United States Census Bureau defines race in five categories and does not specifically define Hispanic with a category of its own. The categories include: white or Caucasian, black or African American, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, Native American or Alaska Native and lastly Asian. The Census in 2010 was the first time the questions asked if a person was Spanish, Hispanic or Latino. The Census Bureau …show more content…
Colorism is concerned with actual skin tone, as opposed to racial or ethnic identity. Colorism is a form of discrimination that gives privileges light skinned people over those who are darker skinned. For example: both will experience the same discrimination. In most cases, a light-skinned Hispanic will still experience the racism, despite having lighter skin and a dark-skinned Hispanic will experience the same thing, but the lighter skinned. Many people believe that colorism is only a “black or Latino” problem but colorism is practiced by whites and all people of …show more content…
They are a culture filled with all sorts of deep and rich traditions. One of the biggest and most important parts is the family or familia, which is the close-knit group that extends past the immediate members of the parents and children and goes all the way through the aunts, uncles, cousins and grandparents. In most Hispanic cultures and households, the father is the head of the family and holds the job or several jobs that financially support the family. While he works, the wife and mother is in charge of keeping the home in order. The extended family has a huge role in most Hispanic families. Grandparents play one of the most important roles within the Hispanic culture as they are very much involved in the parenting of their grandchildren. Grandparents are considered the support system of the family and helping raise their grandkids helps give them sense of purpose as they grow older. The ties are strong in Hispanic/Latino families and if you fall on hard times the people within your family unit have a moral responsibility to help in any way they can, whether it be financially, or unemployment problems and other various life events. They are always there to assist you with any help you may need. There is a giant family obligation within the Hispanic/Latino community. And the entire family with the extended family included often gather together and throw up parties or celebrations for

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