Latin American Nationalism

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For week eleven, the topic for the set of readings was based upon how nationalism is formed in countries as well as several factors that go into modern state building, post-colonialism. The 1950s seemed to be an era where several European countries were letting go many of their colonies, especially in Africa. Relationship between these states seems to be one where it has left a significant impression on the colonized, affecting not only their history but how these states would develop their own identities within the newly liberated states. Among those states having experienced being the “colonized” and with those who were the “colonizer”, it is important to note the difference in nationalism and state building. This set of readings provides …show more content…
The authors argue that these transformations of nationalism are closely related to struggles over the political order within each country. This article differs from other works on nationalism, namely Anderson’s Imagined Communities, explaining that these explanation s of Latin American nationalism are inadequate focusing more on the “creole pioneers’” invention of nations in the struggle for independence from Spain. However the connection with the relationship between colonialism and positive and negative effects on nationalism lies in the colonial categories of ethnoracial exclusion that structured the Spanish colonial empire. These ethnoracial cleavages differentiate between the strong and the weak citizens who are not fully recognized as belonging to the national community. Using Mexico as an example, after the revolution, new state elites rose to power from the growing nationalism of the mestizaje. Contrastingly, Peru experience a blocked transformation where indigenismo was gaining popularity amongst subordinate but quickly repressed during Velasco military …show more content…
What might’ve been one of the most disgraceful and conflicting periods of history exposes Europe as a completely selfish predator exploiting not only resources but people for their own development. Although colonialism might have been a catalyst for the uprising of many nationalistic parties, it is just as important to the many conflicts, civil wars, and overall amount of violence as a result. Imperative to consider, also, is that slave labor and raw materials from these colonized territories helped Europe beautify itself. Europe would not hold its head high without exploitation of these acts of ‘White Man’s Burden” therefore portraying Europe as a “creation of the Third

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