Colonialism And Realism In Henry James And Daisy Miller

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Kate Chopin is considered one of the first feminist writers of the twentieth century; she used literary realism for addressing issues of race, gender, colonialism, slavery, etc. We see her feminist approach in her portraying of women’s realities in the south and how their lack of independence and freedom affect their lives. In the other hand, Henry James is also realist in style, but he depicts reality from an objective impartial position, his personages are portrayed as a mirror. In his novel Daisy Miller, women do not share the same perspective about the world; there is a conflict between traditional and modern viewpoints.
The main protagonist of Henry James’ Daisy Miller totally opposed the women portrayed in Kate Chopin’s short stories.
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Although her origin is unknown, as she is adopted, that does not mean that his origin is necessarily black. Nevertheless, people judged her without doubting or questioning her husband. Here, we see how society tended most of the time to judge women. But, it is until the ending of the story when it is revealed that the carrier of the black gen is his husband, and not her. Therefore, she has been wrongly judged by society, and she was not even given the benefit of the …show more content…
Walker. According to Barnett, “Mrs. Walker’s name may be ironic reflection of the confinement of her own spirit within socially prescribed boundaries’’.
One point that it is important to take into account is that Daisy belongs to the new wealthy American society; therefore this could explain some of her progressive and modern behavior. Her attitudes contrast with the traditional opinions of Mrs. Costello and Mrs. Walker, who have spent a long period of time in Europe until they had become Europeanized. Hence, they might not have adapted to the new understandings of the young American girls living in the new world. Here, we clearly see a contraposition between the Old World manners and the New World values. According to Lynn Wardley, Daisy is an adolescent androgynous character who is characterized for having masculine and feminine features at the same time (232). We see male characteristics in her emancipated, autonomous, self-independent posture. In addition, the lack of a father authority could have promoted her daring behaviors and rebellious attitude. There is no a strong father figure that control her and punish her when she does something against the conventional standards. Her mother is portrayed as someone soft and

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