Colonialism And Post-Colonialism In Chinua Achebe's Arrow Of God

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As an African novel, “Arrow Of God” dwells on the problem of the postcolonial Nigerian society. The theme of the novel centers on the conflict between the African culture and the Western culture as well as the conflict between the Christian ideology and the Traditional religious doctrine . In the novel , The events begin with the political conflict between the two Nigerian neighboring regions of rural Igbo land: Umuaro and Okperi on their boarders to show superiority on each other and this conflict was solved with the interference of the civilized British colonizer ,which Okperi thought of as ideal model to be followed . While the British interference has played a vital role to put an end for the political conflict , the religious and the cultural conflict last till the end of the novel . Consequently , by the end of the whole novel , it was the triumph of Christianity after the death of Ulu ,the god of the traditional religion, which means the death of its religion. Chinua Achebe in his writings seeks to express the culture of his country by inserting some African words in his novel creating a kind of a new African-English language. In the novel "Arrow of God", Achebe Makes …show more content…
Post colonial writers usually attempt to form a post colonial version of their own countries, rejecting the modern and the contemporary , which is tainted with the colonial status of their notion. Post colonialism examines the representation of cultural diversity. The novel “ Arrow of god” talks about colonization that set in Nigeria in early twentieth century. “ Arrow of god” shows the colonizer has the right to rule and make order. Colonization in the novel appears in British government officials and Christian missionaries. Colonization wants to impose its culture and the death of the colonized culture , identity and

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