Colonial Colonization In Virginia

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Colonization in Virginia began in 1606 as an experiment produced by a joint stock company. The idea was to create a colony that would generate profit and become an attribution to the British economy. This was a high expectation and the outposts experienced a considerable amount of challenges before becoming great colonies. Jamestown was the first colony to establish in the Virginia Company; it is well known for being a controversial colony with great prospects but had a lack of knowledge of its surroundings. British men were sent to the colony longing for a new start in life, a life they could benefit from change rather than be forgotten in the monarch’s shadow. “Less than 5 percent of the population was elite, common people were about 95 percent …show more content…
London, England became a city known for being prominent for disease, poverty, and corruption. These were the main reasons for the common citizens to flee to the New World; they desired new opportunity and had ambitions to search for revenue, this eventually became a reality for many English men; however, these previously known common people of England had to work hard to achieve their ambitions. The first permanent English colony was Jamestown on the banks of James River, located in the Chesapeake; the small English outpost was contaminated with famine and several deadly diseases. “Colonists died in droves from disease and hunger. Of the initial 104, only 38 were alive nine months later.” Jamestown also had increased conflicts with the local Native tribes who had lived in the area for many years before the colonies had arrived. The colonists were in an area of unfamiliar climate, they were not culturally disciplined to supply their own food, and death became prominent. Although there were difficulties between the …show more content…
There were only two main towns in the Chesapeake, “the colonial capitals of Jamestown and St. Mary’s City.” With Chesapeake lacking towns, the colonists confided in the counties to form their local governments. In 1619 King James I of England contracted the House of Burgesses, it was formed to solve common problems and pass laws for the colony. The Burgesses were made up of “Crown appointed” colonists who were encouraged to make America a desirable place to immigrate. “The county courts held trials, executed sentences, licensed taverns, and ferries, established and maintained roads, set and collected local taxes, supervised the county militia, conducted elections to the assembly, and enforced provincial legislation. The colonists heavily relied on government and church, interlocking the two to create a “political obedience and religious devotion.” Because of the conflict between church and state, there were several disputes over religious control, the King ruled the state and had control over the Church of England, forcing the colonists to abide by the monarch’s “divine right.” With the colonists conserving their loyalty to the British government, trade regulation acts were enforced. Virginia depended on “balance trade” and because of this the government developed Navigation Acts in 1651. Navigation Acts were introduced to tighten the government’s control over

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