Colloquialism In Salinger's Catcher In The Rye

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people in the military at this time could agree with the horrible conditions This also helped them capture the attention of old veterans through its use of slang and relate to them how their morals only increased when they were away from the war. As well, Holden uses his own form of colloquialism to portray an immature youth of past in Catcher In The Rye. Holden uses many types of immature vocab such as, “Backasswards vomity strictly for the birds” (Salinger). Backasswards is his own immature way of saying backward, and vomity is when he wants to say something makes him feel like vomiting. Strictly for the birds refers to his constant speaking of death where he describes things as roadkill for birds. Holden uses multiple different colloquialisms …show more content…
This can be seen here, “I’d only written that damn note so that he wouldn’t feel too bad about flunking me” (Salinger 8). Salinger comes across negative here because he is still writing about the beginning of the rebellion. This shows that overall, before his new optimistic feelings, he was negative for most of the time showing his increased morals over time. Salinger showed his own sadness through his account of Holden with his only role model, “The last thing Mr. Antolini says to Holden after he has tucked him into his makeshift bed is, "Good night, handsome." So, Holden goes to sleep, but -- "Then something happened. I don't even like to talk about it.Holden Asks him what he is doing, and he says, "Nothing! I'm simply sitting here admiring -- "’ (Barlow, Dudley). This goes to show that Holden was confused about his and others actions throughout his rebellious stage and looked for the negatives in everyone he saw. Even Holden's favorite teacher, who he looked for in time of trouble, he pushed away and accused him of something horrible for the time period they were in. This tone portrays Salinger sadness for Holden's situation and his hope for him to become …show more content…
He uses to tone to portray Holden as getting better in, “Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s around—nobody big, I mean—except me. And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff” (Salinger 102). This is the first time the tone of genuinely caring about someone else is shown throughout the whole novel. This is also seen near the end of his novel where he has developed from his rebellious self and might even try to better now that he is away from the oppressive schools. Salinger was also extremely emotionally involved in the writing of this book by his absence seen here, “After releasing The Catcher in the Rye in 1951, one of the most influential novels in American literature, writer J. D. Salinger disappeared into backwoods” (Davies, Tanya). This shows how mentally challenging it was for Salinger to get across the true sadness Holden had throughout the novel until the end Salinger felt genuinely bad for Holden and that was how he showed Holden's life and caused him to need a mental break and go to the

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