Eastern Culture

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Here it is Professor, and sorry about the confusion.
"Also, of the 5,000 of the Russian community, the most popular religion to follow are the Russian Orthodox Church, Islam, or Christianity."—Of the 5,000 religious Russian community, they are either part of the Russian Orthodox Church, Islam, or Christianity community.
About the Culture
The Eastern culture that I chose for this week’s assignment is the Russian culture.
Geographically, Russia is the largest country in the world. About 141,049,000 individuals populate the large area of 6,601,668 square miles. Many of the individuals living in Russia are either Russian decent, Ukrainian, Tatar, Bashkir, Chuvash, and Chechen. Also, of the 5,000 religious Russian community, they are either part
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Do religion influence collectivistic and individualistic culture and psychology, is a question that Edward Sampson is trying to discuss. “Sampson 's focus on actual and potential Protestant and Jewish influences on culture and psychology in the West be extended at several points,” also known as Rabbinic Judaism (Lynch, 2001). Martin Lynch, Jr., the writer, tells his readers to consider historical patterns of correlation between religion and cultural style. Historical patterns show many Catholics as collectivists and other traditionally Christian nations as individualistic. About Russia, Martin tried to argue that religious beliefs don’t only play a part in conceptions, but also in scientific paradigms. Russians are mostly seen as collectivism. Also, Sobornost, a term used in Russia that plays a role in the development and maintenance of collectivism in Russia. As I mentioned above, Of the 5,000 religious Russian community, they are either part of the Russian Orthodox Church, Islam, or Christianity community; thus, because of their religious back group they’re seen as more of a collectivist than an individualist. And since the West grew to accept the term and cultural theory, he goes one to say that it is plausible to trace a chain of influence from Eastern Christianity through Russian cultural collectivism to Western psychological contextualize. (Lynch,

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