Cold War Civil Rights By Mary Dudziak Analysis

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Mary Dudziak seems to argue that some of the Cold War concerns have convinced the American government to be in support of the civil rights reforms now than they might have been before. It seems, that the problem is in regardance to racial inequality. Dudziak portrays this as the central idea going into international thoughts of the United States negatively. The Soviets (of the Soviet Union) have also contributed to the problem, as a whole, by showcasing America's bad record in regards to their international propaganda. Chapters 2-4 of her book, are where I believed Dudziak conveyed her thesis as a whole. It’s played out that the U.S. embassy and other regarding officers, took over with such a negative coverage of American racial injustice, …show more content…
The reports were claiming that the Cold War was being greatly affected by international perceptions and thoughts of American racial inequality system. In the opening of Cold War Civil Rights: Race and the Image of American Democracy, author Mary Dudziak provides a very strong, 15 page introductory portion of her novel. Chapter 2 of Dudziak’s novel greatly details the ways that the Washington lawmakers have shaped the story of U.S. race relations in the foreign press. By doing this, it showed how the democracy could be portrayed as a superior figure system to communism. The policy of managing the news for foreign consumption and trade although, was anything but democratic. Dudziak reveals the government's efforts to prevent the voices of views as anything other than the "party line." This is primarily where Dudziak focuses on the civil rights activities not of the …show more content…
The Secretary of State, Dean Acheson wrote in 1947, "[T]he existence of discrimination against minority groups in this country has an adverse effect upon our relations with other countries. We are reminded over and over by some foreign newspapers and spokesmen, that our treatment of various minorities leaves much to be desired.... We will have better international relations when those reasons for suspicion and resentment have been removed" (p. 80). Closely relating, it seemed as if the U.S. Ambassador had used a 1952 speech to hammer and get the message home across. Going further on in the story it said, "A year, or even a week in Asia is enough to convince any perceptive American that the colored peoples of Asia and Africa, who total two-thirds of the world's population, seldom think about the United States without considering the limitations under which our 13 million Negroes are living" (p. 77). Bowles was depicted as a liberal person, who was also extremely concerned about racial injustice. But it was almost as if other State Department officers, had very little to no prior interest in race relations, and found themselves forced to deal with international condemnation as a result of American racial inequality. State department personnel were among the first people in the

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