Greatest Generation Cohort

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Cohorts are groups of people working together. The Business Insider speaks in terms of Gen X and Gen Y, baby boomer and millennials depending on what year you were born will define the category you belong in. Cohorts are explained as an unclear grouping of people within these generational groups as having common involvements. In other terms we could say that the dividing line is just a mix of the two groups (Nisen, 2013). “The greatest generation,” a term invented by broadcaster Tom Brokaw described a group of men and women who either fought in World War II or did something to help the war effort on home ground (Nisen, 2013). The men in this group were regarded as having a duty to their country and working hard to better themselves and their family situation. Those who were too young to serve in World War II are called the “silent generation,” a story in Time …show more content…
The Greatest Generation, born between 1925-1942, is a group of people who were trying to balance the Great depression and the war in Europe, it was during this generation when the Nation, as Tom Brokaw puts it, dependent upon its young people to fight the enemy. People in this generation were ready to volunteer for what they felt to be “their duty” (Brokaw, 1998). Brokaw talks about the scope of involvement that this generation and how their involvement changed the world. The world was absorbed in war and every adult in the United States became involved in either fighting or contributing to the effort. This generation of people, Brokaw calls the “generation birth-marked for greatness and one that would leave the biggest mark in history. Those who survive this generation today would be economically and politically minded because of their own sacrifices and able to give their time to teaching and to leading. Older adults inspire by speaking of experience, patriotism and values. They value stability, are dedicated, and are respectful. They

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