The Benefits Of Bilingualism

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Studies concerning deficits or benefits of bilingualism have been researched for many years. Early studies from the 1920’s era, which had poor designs, caused people to believe that teaching children to be bilingual and or just being bilingual led to great cognitive deficits that were highly detrimental linguistically and cognitively (Hakuta et al., 1985). Later studies recognized the faults in the prior studies and attempted many different methods to try correct issues with methodology as well as maintain better balance with subjects that was lacking in the early research. Hakuta and Diaz (1985) pointed out many studies that showed that bilingual children focused more on semantic differences with words than how they sound as well as differences …show more content…
Although, many areas can be accounted for there will always be a variable that could be influencing the results (Hakuta et al., 1985). The study Hakuta and Diaz (1985) performed was primarly those who were learning English as a second language. Pinpointing only students who are learning English as a second language and not also testing subjects that were English dominant and learning a second language appears to be a drawback within this study as to whether the rise in cognitive ability arises from becoming bilingual or the prior cognitive ability is what aids in becoming bilingual (Hakuta et al., …show more content…
A study that could strengthen my view of the cognitive effects of learning a second language would include aspects of all of these studies. Hakuta and Diaz (1985) did point out several flaws that researchers had been making up until their research yet even within their longitudinal study the neglected to account for children who were learning other languages other than English to see what cognitive benefits they were receiving. Hakuta and Diaz’s (1985) idea of studying the cognitive abilities prior to learning of the second language is a large strength since their aim was to show whether it was the second language or the cognitive abilities the children already possessed as to whether or not the learning of a second language was actually cognitively beneficial. Abrieu and colleagues (2012) testing of children learning a non-dominant language was interesting since it was not learning a different language that would assist them in everyday life instances as would the other studies since they were learning a dominant language. In conclusion accounting for variables of socioeconomic and culture are important what all of the studies have missed that I find important in knowing whether cognitive abilities are greater for those who are bilingual

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