Cognitive Behavior Therapy Theory

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Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) is a scientifically tested form of psychotherapy that is effective for many different disorders and problems. In contrast to many forms of therapy, CBT is a solution-focused approach to treatment, oriented toward solving problems and learning skills “Beck Institute”. CBT has several different approaches a therapist can use: Rational Emotive Behavior (REBT), Rational Living Therapy (RTL), Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Dialectic Behavior Therapy (DBT). The Founder of Cognitive Behavior Therapy is Dr. Albert Ellis and co-founder Aaron Beck, MD of psychiatrist. Dr. Albert Ellis was a clinical a psychologist. Ellis vbvbvbvREBT was developed by Ellis dealing with his own problems during his youth. In the 1950’s …show more content…
Judith Beck is Aaron Beck granddaughter whom is a key figure who help developed CT. Beck is a graduate of Brown University and Yale School of Medicine. Beck is the founder of Beck Institute which is a research and training center. Beck’s main purpose of developing CT was for the research for depression. “Beck’s observation of depression clients revealed that they had a negative bias in their interpretation of certain life events, which contributed to their cognitive distortions. (Corey 2009). Beck believed that negative thought reflect underlying dysfunctional beliefs and …show more content…
It was a point in my life when I was younger I had to seek out counseling for some problems I was going through. The therapist I was seeking therapy used a lot of CBT and she stated in our first session how much she likes this approach and hopefully it will work for me. I agree with her, a lot of the approaches and techniques she used it worked for me. Secondly, CBT is problem and actions focused approach. “CBT is based on the idea that our thoughts causes our feelings and behaviors, not external things like people, situations and event. The benefit of this fact is that we can change the way we think to feel/ act better even if the situation does not change (National Association of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapist).Thirdly, CBT focuses on the present, not the past. I believe if the client focus on the present the past is no longer irrelevant to some extent. I feel the client may understand how deal with outside influences, even if the situation may not change. Fourthly, the reason I chose CBT is the therapist and client roles are collaborative and the client set its own goals and objective throughout therapy. Fifthly, the reason I chose CBT make the person accountable for their actions and not pinpoint on someone else. Last, I chose CBT because, of the four systems a person may go through (1) cognitive- what the person thinks. (2) Behavior-what the person says or do. (3) Affective- the emotions a

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