Climate Change: The Human Impact On The Environment

1788 Words 8 Pages
The human impact on the environment is undeniable; according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), from 1880 to 2012 the average global temperature increased by .85 degrees Celsius. This temperature increase may not appear noticeable or extensive; however, when considering detrimental worldwide effects there are many clearly correlated drawbacks to uninhibited climate increase. Each one degree increase in temperature leads to about a five percent decrease in grain yields. Maize, wheat, and a variety of other key crops are negatively affected with global yields decreasing forty megatons each year between 1981 and 2002 due to the temperature increase. Ocean temperatures increase, snow and ice has melted, and sea levels are …show more content…
The report also outlined the clear correlations between various human activities and the accumulation of greenhouse gasses and subsequent temperature increases. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the earth’s atmosphere is directly linked to the average global temperature on Earth, and the most abundant of greenhouse gas, Carbon dioxide, is produced through the burning of fossil fuels, which we have used since the Industrial Revolution to fuel cars and airplanes, power electricity plants, heat our homes, and produce a variety of common products (What Are). In addition, clear cutting forests, certain farming methods, and the industrialization that has allowed for growing populations, economies, and living standards have caused greenhouse gas numbers to dramatically rise in the past one hundred and fifty years (The Science). The greenhouse gasses we release into the atmosphere, including Carbon dioxide, Methane, Nitrous oxide, Hydrofluorocarbons, Perfluorocarbons, and Sulphur hexaflouride contribute to the amount of heat the atmosphere traps, thus adding to global climate increases. Additionally, the clear cutting of forests to use wood or forested land for industrial purposes releases large amounts specifically of Carbon dioxide while not allowing plants, which take …show more content…
However, without major changes there is very little chance of not surpassing this limit. United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), officials predict that the world is about twenty five percent behind in its effort to coordinate de-carbonization and a sufficient greenhouse gas reduction effort to remove about fifty eight billion tons of Carbon Dioxide from the earth’s atmosphere by the year 2020 (Russel). In 1997 the Kyoto Protocol was established in Kyoto, Japan as a possible method for an international effort for greenhouse gas reduction at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Though the Protocol industrialized nations agree to reduce emissions of greenhouse gasses based on 1990 levels by a certain percentage. The first target period to have the total emissions cuts accomplished was 2008- 2012, and the second extends from 2013-2020 after which a new agreement will need to be made (India). Article 3 of the Protocol states “The parties included in Annex 1 shall, individually or jointly, ensure that their aggregate anthropogenic carbon dioxide equivalent emissions of the greenhouse gasses… do not exceed their assigned amounts…

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