Climate Change In Sub-Saharan Africa Case Study

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As climate change will affect every stage of the food system from production and processing to distribution and consumption, there will be an immense association with a state’s capacity to trade and their ability to sustain a food secure population. Gardner concludes that the food export capacity of Northern Hemisphere developed countries could rise, while food deficit in the Global South will likely increase (120). Most of the regions of sub-Saharan Africa face structural difficulties that threaten to exacerbate the effects of climate change and hamper effective countermeasures (Gardner 131). As more than half of the African population lives in rural areas and food production has been declining for the past several decades, high population …show more content…
Sundaram indicates that Africa has remained in a declining marginal role in overall world trade for decades; however, exports of minerals (namely petroleum) and other agricultural products have risen significantly in recent years (17). According to Sundaram, Africa is less dependent on developed country demand for its exports and has increased its relations with East Asia and the ASEAN members (17). Africa’s reliance on mineral exports and trade partners with Asia could prove to be increasingly detrimental as both regions are at a high-risk for weather pattern changes and other warming effects. The Berg Report noticed a general neglect of agriculture and food security in Africa since the 1980s, as public spending for infrastructure, agricultural research and development, extension services and agricultural subsidies declined while official support and encouragement was limited to export-oriented …show more content…
For example, Niger is one of the poorest countries in the world where the average income is 400 dollars per year and 80 percent of the population is made up of farmers who work in the agricultural sector (Ogden 1). Brown determined that in 2009, the satellite data showed that there was a major drought that affected the communities across Niger, as food became scarce and local prices began to rise (Ogden 1). The cost of moving grain from other countries increased local prices even more and resulted in high food insecurity and malnourishment, particularly among the most vulnerable portions of society. This example can be equated to a global scale if climate change continues to affect other nations in such a manner. Brown’s model uses observations and computer information to relate satellite data, food production, and international price so that it can be used to improve humanitarian response to these kinds of crises (Ogden 1). Brown concludes that she wants to “reach decision makers in government and international-aid institutions so they can reduce the impact of weather and commodity price shocks on food security in vulnerable communities” (Ogden 1). This kind of technological and scientific innovation is absolutely what must continue in order to improve

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