Clever Murasaki's The Tale Of Genji

1758 Words 8 Pages
The Heian period, which lasted from 794 to 1185 CE, was undoubtedly the basis of modern Japanese culture. The period began when the Emperor, Emperor Kammu, moved the capital of Japan from Nara to Heian-Kyō (now known as Kyoto) after Buddhist monasteries became oppressive. The Heian period is also known for the Fujiwara Clan. During the Heian period, the emperor lost most of his power and became more of a representative to Japan letting aforementioned Fujiwara Clan gain said power. They were a select family of aristocrats who lived close to the imperial family and essentially held the strings of the emperor like a puppeteer. In the midst of the Heian period lived a strong aristocracy, close to the emperor and the Fujiwara. These aristocrats …show more content…
Essentially, to be able to compare themselves to other nobles, every noble in the Heian period had a rank. These ranks were imperative to how one could treat others and how others can treat one. Many times, The Tale of Genji represents struggles nobles would have experienced concerning with their ranks. One such event is when becomes Genji is emperor and his son, Yūgiri, begs him to raise his rank. Clever Murasaki uses Yūgiri to show the aristocrat’s childish want to climb up the social ladder. Another comical example of the periods need to rank everyone and everything is when nonhuman beings such as ghosts and even the emperor’s cat are given ranks. One can simply see the satirical nature in which The Tale of Genji represents ranking among the …show more content…
From tiny details like the societal rankings of cats to life decisions like Genji choosing to end his life in a retreat, Genji makes a world from millennia ago seem fresh and entertaining while still being extraordinarily educational. Books like The Tale of Genji are the reason literature will always touch the heart of anyone who reads. Thus, literature is quite simply the most elegantly simple way to bridge generations, centuries and millennia

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