Moral Cognitive Decision-Making

Improved Essays
2.2 Behavioral sciences
In several occasions during the first part of this essay it the importance to appeal to the emotional thinking of the decision maker was mentioned. This sounds like a fundament that lacks technical rigor if not corny. To better develop this point, I permit myself to quote the work of Benton (2009):
[An] emerging field, moral cognitive neuro-science, provides us with additional insight into the human decision making process. The roles of deliberation, affect and emotion are highlighted through this research […which] is in direct opposition to the classical Cartesian view of decision-making as a reasoned, emotion-free process. By using brain imaging… researchers have determined that two clear neural processes, cognitive
…show more content…
This sounds like a fundament that lacks of technical rigor if not corny. But research on moral cognitive neuro-science have determined that two clear neural processes, cognitive and affective, are involved in decision making. Hence, in the quest for the inducements that can cause change in the behavior, I am interested not only on the rational construction cause-effect but also on the sentimental assimilation of the message. It has been demonstrated, for example, that the preferences of individuals can be influenced by the way the case to be decided is formulated. Accordingly, to improve the quality of decisions a decision-maker should focus on future experiences and ask “What will I feel then?” rather than “What do I want now?” The former question, when answered with care, can be a more useful guide in difficult …show more content…
The best example is the study of the warning labels on the packages of tobacco that guided the design of Figure 1. Those researches, not exempt of recent critics, range from the support or rejection of the regulation, to the proposals for more efficient deterrence effect.
In his report to the Directorate General for Health and Consumers of the European Commission, Sambrook Research International (2009) stresses six principles, from which the first two we can extract

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Moral Reasoning Theory

    • 1358 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In conclusion, the topic of the psychology of moral reasoning is important in understanding the psychological aspect that influence human behaviors. It is evident from the journal article that emotions and morals are two psychological aspects that are in interplay to influence the moral reasoning of a person. However, it is notable that there are instances when people think unconsciously to reach moral conclusions. Therefore, it is recommendable for future research to focus on the psychology of unconscious reasoning to arrive at a moral…

    • 1358 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    With the development of positive psychology, his paper also touches on the importance of both perspectives, as well as their philosophical grounding and implications. Waterman (2013) examines the implications of both the humanistic and the positivist perspective in terms of empirical research strategies of the two, their goals and strategies with therapeutic conditions and counselling interventions, and conceptualized human nature. This is observed in part, in regards to relative importance of one perspective to the other. He argues how these trivial different aspects of positive psychology will ultimately end in narrow research success and would ultimately be fundamentally be difficult to achieve based on their differences in most aspects of…

    • 928 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Human beings can settle on decisions and in this manner have duty. 5. Human beings are deliberate, go for objectives, know that they cause future occasions, and look for significance, quality and imagination. In 2007, McLeod hypothesis about humanistic methodology works on the fundamental supposition that individuals have through and through freedom and have a natural yearning to improve themselves and the world. Humanism additionally dismisses the logical methodology utilized as a part of different strategies for mental study and places accentuation on people being in a general sense unique in relation to different humans since people are equipped for thought, reason and dialect.…

    • 2251 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Mainstream Psychology

    • 1924 Words
    • 8 Pages

    The extent to which psychology meets the criteria of a science has been questioned. Critical theorists have highlighted the ways in which scientific/psychological accounts are constructed, therefore challenging the notion that these simply reflect the truth/facts. In addition the role of values and ideologies have been highlighted, further challenging the notion that psychology is objective and value free. However it has been indicated by those such as Harris that the role of personal biases and political agendas in psychology’s history may have been subject to…

    • 1924 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Debunking Ethical Realism

    • 712 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The proposed challenge would be to explain how we evolved to have the rational capacities that allow us to grasp moral facts and, as FitzPatrick also suggests, how we evolved the emotional capacities to grasp such facts (30-31). He believes that it is plausible that we have evolved in just such a way. So with the addition of reasoning and emotional training it is plausible that our moral beliefs track moral facts, rather than being distorted by forces such as…

    • 712 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Jogalekar first states that Berezow's defining qualities for what makes something scientific are reasonable, yet incomplete and narrow. He believes Berezow's criteria should be used more "like a ruler for psychology to examine its own gaps and goals" (Jogalekar 2013). His defense for psychology begins early on by confronting first against what he states is Berezow's largest argument against psychology; lack of adequate definitions and…

    • 735 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In addition, the writer explains how “Argumentation aims at a delayed, critical acceptance of a proposition, after an examination of the supporting proofs; persuasion aims at a more immediate and less critical adoption.” (? 3). The writer demonstrates how using logic in order to allow others to accept your ideas will delay the response since they are truthfully taking all things into consideration. However, the emotional appeal creates action right away even if the reason why they are doing so isn’t clear. Therefore, the most crucial rhetorical appeal would be logos because it enlightens the audience with facts and evidence in order to make a final decision rather than manipulating the audience with…

    • 262 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Therefore, some findings show that self-help mantra usually helps in alleviating emotional problems among people while other empirical evidence indicates otherwise. Other studies have shown that, even though self-help mantra may alleviate psychological problems, the approach cannot be used in isolation. Instead, clinical interventions have to be employed if a more significant effect is to be reached. Surprisingly, some research findings have depicted that it is possible that self-help mantras can be used in isolation to produce the most optimal effects. Hence, going into the future, there is a crucial need for more targeted research to depict the real status quo concerning the research topic under…

    • 1363 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Logotherapy is underpinned by the humanistic paradigm, as its key concepts recognise human individuality and freedom, as well as their need to fulfil their potential and find meaning. To understand the connection between humanism and logotherapy, it is important to first take a look at what humanism is, and how it came about. Humanism, often referred to as the “Third Force” of psychology, emerged in the 1960’s in response to what some psychologists considered the shortcomings of behaviourism and psychoanalysis. These psychologists wanted to develop a different approach to studying humankind, an approach that emphasised humanisation as opposed to dehumanisation of the person. They criticised behaviourism for being preoccupied with the behaviour…

    • 1050 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Cigarette Ad Analysis

    • 927 Words
    • 4 Pages

    However, this ad plays a false sense of logos and ethos, twists negative words into a positive way, and poses an unconvincing claim that cigarettes can enhance your quality of life. The title of this ad is “Not One Single Case of Throat Irritation due to Smoking Camels.” This is the first thing you read when you look at the ad. It is at the top of the page and in bold lettering. The word “Camel” is in a different color and font. Featured in this ad is a doctor holding, what appears to…

    • 927 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays