African American Civil Rights Movement Leaders Essay

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African American Civil Rights Movement Leaders The civil rights movement of the late 1800s to the 1960’s was a time of racial unification in America’s history for African Americans. Discrimination based on race has been an ongoing issue in America from the start, the American Civil War had a major impact on the freedom of colored men and women. Yet, after the abolishment of slavery white brutality still rained hatred upon people of color. Many great African American activist strived to bring about a better life for the African American community by standing up and speaking against segregation. A life that would stop the discrimination of individuals on the basis of color. Although many different approaches were used by these great leaders, they all contributed to the big picture, the fight for …show more content…
Martin Luther King, Jr. was a young African American pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, who believed in nonviolent protest (King 121). King organized the bus boycott as a peaceful protest against the harsh discrimination of African Americans, as he did with many other nonviolent protests. He had a dream that one day everyone would be equal, and not be judged by the color of their skin but by their character (King 122). That each individual would completely mesh with those of a different color. Although Malcolm X, another great African American activist, had a different point of view. Malcolm X believed in uniting the African American community, instead of meshing with white people. Malcolm X converted to Islam in prison and later became a Muslim minister and a member of the militant Black Muslims organization” (Little 123). Malcolm X was not concerned whether or not his protest would be violent or not. Although that logic changed at the end of his life. He believes that no matter what, they will have to fight, so why not fight here and now for their own

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