Civil Rights Movement Research Paper

1976 Words 8 Pages
The civil rights movement seemed to start in 1948 when President Truman banned racial discrimination in the armed forces via an executive order. It really started in 1954 with Brown v. Board of Education and lasted until 1968 with fair housing. The purpose of the movement was to fight social injustices towards the African American community. Over the course of 14 years, the civil rights movement grew successful in the efforts to end discrimination. Freedom marches, peaceful protests, and boycotts spread the importance of the movement. These protests were met with legal action in the favor of the black community. The civil rights movement saw many legal victories that killed discrimination across various planes. The movement grew popular …show more content…
Board of Education was the Supreme Court ruling that declared that separate is not equal and that segregation in schools is unconstitutional in 1954. In 1957 the Little Rock Nine made the news when they first attempted to attend an Arkansas high school after school segregation was removed due to the court decision (Thornburg). The harassment became so unbearable that President Eisenhower had to send in military members to escort them inside the building. Due to the efforts of the civil rights movement, every child in America now has the same chance at a strong education because school facilities are not “separate but equal”. After the 1965 incident called “Bloody Sunday”, federal protection has been made required for all future freedom marches (Thornburg). This era provided protection of African Americans when fighting for their rights in the decades to …show more content…
That includes protests, lobbying, marches, etc. The leaders of the civil rights movement knew how to ignite political pressure and that is how it got presidents to send out executive orders, the government to pass laws, and get the military to protect students even if there was not much support for those students (Rosenberg, 1150). The members sure knew how make it difficult for society to ignore racial discrimination and injustices. This kind of pressure is important because the government will not act unless forced to. Federal action comes from political mobilization, and ending discrimination is dependent on this as well (Rosenberg, 1150). Racial discrimination has been woven into the fabric of the United States, so it will be hard to overcome; however, it will not be impossible (Rosenberg, 1153). The civil rights movement proved that. The legislation passed during that time period marked milestones for African

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