Civil Liberties And Civil Rights: Civil Liberties Vs. Civil Rights

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Jocelinne Perfecto Professor Sherry Sharifian Government 2305-71013 25, September, 2017 SLO#1 Civil Liberties v Civil Rights Generating from the words civil liberties and civil rights, we can gain an understanding that the meaning of these words implies important aspects into our daily lives. The term civil liberties as defined in We the People by Thomas Patterson, is a person’s individual protection from government actions also known as government infringement. (Patterson 93) These civil liberties stem from the Bill of Rights which was ratified in 1791 with the first ten amendments in which the government is obligated to protect. (Patterson 94) On the other hand, civil rights note whether members of society regardless of their race,
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(Patterson 97) I believe this to be so because there has been an ongoing way of expression where members of society, especially in the minority context, like myself, have voiced ourselves on issues we truly believe in such as allowing the DACA recipients to stay, to stopping the SB4 law from taking into effect. It has created a major influence in this world because of how much has changed throughout the years in ways that the supreme court has used their power and their knowledge of the Bill of rights and the first amendment in which we are protected under, to yield these unconstitutional …show more content…
Board of Education of Topeka, from the Oyez.org website as well, decided in 1954, which in the end depicts a basis of equality. This case constitutes on the motive of segregation of public school’s due to a person’s race where African American students have been denied the ability to attend certain public school’s due to their skin color. An argument arose stating that this violated the equal protection clause of the 14th amendment stating that the students denied must be allowed to attend those public schools. The question throughout the case was whether the clause was violated which resulted in a unanimous decision of yes. The reasoning for this conclusion stated that “separate but equal” did not imply equality and violated the 14th amendment while also noting that segregation in public schools generated inferiority while also having an affecting those students. (Oyez) The situation that has a greater influence on the quality of life on the United States must be from the Brown v. Board of education case due to drastic changes that have been made throughout the education system generating equality for students to achieve their dreams without their skin color affecting their future. All the united states would register a deep impact on the judicial decisions made on this case because generally every school has been affected by the decision in this court case there is no segregation while generating equality throughout race which

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