Dred Scott Decision Essay

Superior Essays
1. The Dred Scott decision was a famous ruling in history of the courts. Scott had claimed that he was a resident on free land so that had made him free. Others thought different from Scott, so he sued for his freedom and he won. The decision was in effect when it had been declared unconstitutional by the Republican platform of restricting slavery’s expansion. Dred Scott died the night before the Civil War and only enjoyed his freedom for a few short years.
2. The War of 1812 was a struggle between the Indians and the British. This war had produces many wins for those who sided with the British. With neither the British nor the Americans wanting to continue the war they had signed a treaty and although the treaty was signed in December 1814 it
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Cahokia had between 10,000 and 30,000 inhabitants in the year 1200. The residents built huge mounds. What little is known of Cahokia’s political and economic structure in life. Cahokia stood as the largest settled community and had beat New York and Philadelphia in the 1800.
4. Alexander Hamilton was born in West Indies in 1755. He was a youthful leader of the nationalist of the 1780s. He served as an army officer in the war at a young age. Hamilton was a vigorous proponent of the government that would enable the new nation to become a powerful commercial to the world affairs.
Section II:
1. In the removal of the Indians in the United States cost many lives both Indian and American. In 1823, the court case Johnson v. M’Intosh, the courts had proclaimed that the Indians were not land owners even though the Indians were there first. Cherokee Nation v. Georgia (1831), it was decided that the Indians were only wards of the land for the federal government. It is said that the Indians only deserved paternal regard and protection, but they were indeed not citizens and would not be allowed their rights. With the legal appeals exhausted one fraction of a tribe agreed to cede their

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