City Of Thorns Case Study

2124 Words 9 Pages
In the book, City of Thorns: nine lives in the world’s largest refugee camp, by Ben Rawlance, the stories of the lives of nine refugees present the struggles and frustrations of the tangled lives in a refugee camp with on-going conflict. There is a lot of different issues occurring throughout their experiences in the camps, some very horrific and life threatening to these individuals. Although the book focus more on the men in the camps, the experiences the women goes through demonstrate that there is a global health issue with maternal and child health care services. These experiences are shaped by the situation of being a refugee and living in a conflict zone and they outline the type of intervention they find most important and appealing. …show more content…
From these stories and class discussions, the refugee population mostly consist of women and children. In this case, this issue is also influenced by the issue of conflict and limited resources. One aspect of maternal and child health that is lacking in these refugee camps in this case, is the lack of pre- and post-natal follow up with health care professionals to monitor the state of the mother and newborn. In a study conduct in Kenya in 2008-2009, they found that only “18 percent of respondents used adequate maternal health care services” (Achia & Mageto, 2015). This means even Kenyan mothers who are welcome to seek maternal health care aren’t receiving the adequate care they need. Referencing back to what Cheryl say, these mothers are not stupid and that there must be something else that is contributing to the issue being …show more content…
Many of the refugees don’t have huts that were created for them, instead, similar to Poor Economics, they build their housing units when they have time (Banerjee & Duflo). One strategy would be to have volunteers assign in the construction of stable shelters with better materials. The importance of creating “system building blocks” to help improve the quality, access, and safety (Kerber et. al, 2007). In order for improvement of health service and try to create outpatient service, the foundations of having a somewhat stable system needs to be intact or at least addressed. Again, in this case, it’s a difficult task to due to the high conflict level in the camp from the Kenyan government. Another strategy of this intervention is to educate the camps how to keep and maintain clean water as well as have small gardens that provide a supplementary food source to the food rations they received for each block. One key thing that the book discussed many time was Somali’s value of sharing with others. Trying to maintain that value may prevent further shattering of

Related Documents