Ingoldsby And Shaw Summary

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Bruno Bettelheim, Daniel Shaw, and Erin M. Ingoldsby Indicate that children react in various ways due to the absence of one parent, in the case of divorce. Both Shaw and Ingoldsby believe that having one parent missing puts a huge stress on a child. They also believe that along with this stress causes the child to have other problems that may also relate to behavioral problems.In the essay there are specific problems that are discussed in the essay are externalizing problems, internalizing problems, and cognitive deficits. Each of these three problems has their own factors and reasons behind them. Bettelheim discusses the conflicts it can cause siblings to have with one parent gone and also a rivalry. All authors discuss a common point which …show more content…
Researchers have found lots of evidence that this problem is found more in girls than boys. Bettelheim explains an interesting point, at every point of a kids life, whether it is a boy or a girl, they feel left out at some moments in life(Bettelheim 281). This point that he is trying to prove is an internal problem that children may have with themselves when one parent may go somewhere but they don't get to enjoy it with them. The internal problems with children start off at a young age, anywhere from the third or fourth grade. In fact, in Ingoldsby and Shaw's essay, they explain a study that was done and teachers say they even see the students who don't a full family more depressed than others. Kids from the age range of 12-16 have been reported with more self- reported distress and depression(Shaw). Bettelheim relates this back to his essay when he begins to talk about a child, who has so many fears about being left out and alone, tend to take there angers out on their siblings. The reasoning behind this is because of how the child feels about their brother or sister are because of the amount of attention they receive from either parent (Bettelheim 281).With this problem that is mostly internal it is shown more in girls because of jealousy, which is mostly seen in younger girls in these types of …show more content…
With the stress that is on the child, it can cause them to go through different stages of life they might not have to go through. In addition to this stress children don't show it like any other adult they have their own ways to show it. Bettelheim explains that children may show their stress by conflicting with their siblings and disobeying others.Shaw and Ingoldsby explained three problems; externalizing, internalizing and cognitive deficit, which each had their own characteristics and ways to be shown. Externalizing was basically described as the delinquency and disobedience that is shown. Internalizing is expressed as jealousy from not receiving as much attention from one parent as a child would like to receive. Finally, there is cognitive deficit which is described as more of an academic and peer issue that children may have. In today's society, we show only the perfect families but we fail to realize every family is not perfect and some people have to go to trials in life. The essay at hand explains a myriad of ways that stress can impact a child, and even though you may not see it, it is still

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