Christ's Death In Mark: The Crucifixion Of Jesus Christ

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I grew up with comic books and cartoons depicting villains and superheroes. What frustrated me the most was that the heroes never die physically in these stories and has no ending. This is why I chose the crucifixion of Jesus christ because Jesus Christ is like a superhero in the book of bible, but ends up dying by the hands of his own followers. It 's a story about a superhero that has a beginning and the end. When i read the bible, Jesus christ is the ultimate symbol for heroism. Jesus christ depicts love, kindness, dream, and hope. It is one of the oldest story about a hero and has a great storyline with a ending. The story of Jesus christ continues a little bit more after his resurrection, but i believe his story on earth ended …show more content…
Three of the canonical Gospels, especially John, exhibits the most popular symbol of christ 's death, which is forgiveness of sins. However, from the journal "Mark 's Interpretation of the Death of Jesus" and "The Significance of Jesus ' Death in Mark: Narrative Context and Authorial Audience", the authors talks about how the meaning of Jesus 's death doesn 't really represent forgiveness of sins in human kind in the book of Mark. The journal/articles goes on to explain about several interpretation of the death of Jesus from the book of new testament from the Gospel of …show more content…
"Gospel of Mark makes no explicit connection between the death of Jesus and the forgiveness of sins. The "ransom saying" in 10:45 is best translated a ransom "in substitution for many," implying that the problem overcome by Jesus ' "giving his life" was captivity or slavery rather than guilt. A first-century Greek-speaking audience would probably have understood that, although the "service" of the Markan Jesus does involve forgiving sins (2:1-12), the narrative taken as a whole suggests that the death of the Markan Jesus performs "for many" the service of liberation from bondage to oppression for membership in the covenant community that constitutes a "house of prayer for all the nations" (11:17). The "cup saying" in 14:24 alludes to Exod 24:8, where the blood is that of a covenant-sealing sacrifice, not that of a sin or guilt offering. Because Matt 26:28 makes the connection by adding "for the forgiveness of sins" to the cup saying, some scholars believe that Matthew 's reading must have been implicit in Mark." (Elizabeth pg.

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