Differences Between Christianity And Liberalism Machen

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Christianity and Liberalism by J. Gresham Machen explains the foundational differences between liberals and biblically faithful Christians. In the book, Machen explores these differences through the fundamental Christian tenets like Scriptures, sacred doctrines, salvation, and Jesus’ divinity. Machen claims that Liberalism and Christianity cannot co-exist as they are founded on completely different foundational concepts. The author attempts to prove his point through four major examples. First, Liberalism is based upon respecting past, but refusing to be under its dominion. A liberal ponders, investigates, and rejects sacred beliefs and writings if they do not commend to his intelligence or moral values. Therefore, liberals claim that even the most Christians writing, including Scriptures must be refuted and dismantled if they do not agree with a human mind. Conversely, Machen states that Christianity is founded upon Scriptures, implying that the Scriptures are the most sacred presentation of God and their validity must not be questioned or changed by the human reason. Hence, Liberalism is totally different than Christianity as it is based on emotions and perceptions as …show more content…
Although the movement was supposed to save Christianity, it actually obliterates Christianity by following a set of completely different fundamental notions. In my opinion, Liberals base their faith on subjectivity by using human mind to infer the accuracy of the Bible or Jesus. To them, nothing is sacred and everything can be changed and viewed differently depending on the current beliefs, experimentations, and discoveries. By having this attitude, Liberals shift the direction of faith from being sacred and permanent to being earthly and temporary. I strongly disagree with this practice as I believe that Christianity is not just faith, but a way of life in which we should follow and respect everything it has to

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