Frederic Chopin Music Analysis

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How is music created? Music is a very complicated piece of art in which it is composed of passion, emotion, and tension. During the eighteenth century, music became a great role in people’s social and academic lives. Frederic Chopin was a Romantic Era (eighteenth century) pianist, which meant that he not only composed music during the Romantic Era, but his music was influenced by that era as well. He set aside many hours working on each note, making sure it was perfect and it would not be finished till everything about his song was perfect. In addition, each aspect of his music opens up the audience to a small area of his life. Through descriptive and compelling music, Frederic Chopin changed the way the Romantic Era had experienced music. …show more content…
Not everyone enjoyed Chopin’s music when they heard him play. Particularly when Chopin played in Paris in 1832, the Parisians did not take to his music at first, but later they began to enjoy his style and how he inclusively composed the notes. At first, Chopin’s music seemed to be abnormal to his audience, but they grew to like his versatile way of ordering notes to make a tune. Chopin was different from other pianist of the eighteenth century which gave him great success in his music. Chopin effectively used a technique of writing smaller works encompassed with severe emotion rather than what other composer of his time, who were writing grand scale pieces. In chopin’s song “Fantaisie Impromptu”, the fast tempo and composition of notes brought together, told a remarkable story. In the beginning of the song, it starts fast and upbeat leaving little room for mindlessness of the listener. About half way into the song, the melody becomes gradually slower and gentle giving the audience an open interpretation of the contrasting upbeat fierce melody to the serene melody in the middle (Claramxx). What seemed effortless and soothing to hear, brought great trial and hardship for Chopin to write. He was overly critical of his work, making himself crazy trying to formulate the perfect melody that he had in his head on paper (Nicholas). He evoked emotions from his audience and helped provide …show more content…
Chopin communicated aspects of the Romanticism era that had not yet before been implanted in music. His versatile and emotional pieces brought his audience more in love with his music. As well as writing music during the Romantic Era, Chopin also became sick with Tuberculosis. The disease became very common among those living in the eighteenth century, which helped him relate to his audience through the common struggle he shared with them (“Chopin”). In addition, Paris was a city that was seen as a center for Romanticism, especially expression in music (Libbey). Chopin moved to Paris and there he composed most of his most famous pieces there. Another part of the Romantic Era were salons. Salons had become a famous attraction for parisian high class thus Chopin enjoyed performing for salons over public appearances. He reveled in the ideas which were being spread through salons and he wanted to be a part of the discovery by playing his music at salons (“Chopin”). Throughout the entire era which Chopin composed and performed music, he was able to embellish upon key aspects of the era which were being circulated among the people. Frederic Chopin changed how those in the Romantic era listened and produced music through his own accomplishments. Music creates a new focus and view for its audience, taking attention from other forms of entertainment. The sound which

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