Cholera In The City Of Sandusky In Ohio

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Cholera is a condition that is spread by eating food and drinking water that is contaminated with human feces. Individuals who contract cholera mostly suffer from vomiting, severe diarrhea, and cramps. These people may even die from dehydration within short periods of a few hours or even days following the appearance of the first symptoms. Cholera epidemics began as early as 1830s killing several US citizens, particularly Ohioans. Cholera is believed to have arrived in the US in 1832 with European immigrants and businessmen who had traveled across Lake Erie. The people who lived in the Cleveland area were the first ones in Ohio to contract cholera. This disease was more virulent in the cities because these places had poor sanitation systems. …show more content…
It was worst hit during the 1832 and 1849 epidemics leading to over a hundred deaths of people and emigration of people from the city out of fear of this disease.iv This city was aware of the outbreak because the cholera reports were published in the Clarion newspapers. Following July 2, 1832, Sandusky City passed an ordinance which stated that no vessel was allowed to be brought to Sandusky Bay if that person did not have a written permission to do so from the Board of Health. The few people that died in Sandusky were around thirty, and they included those who were travelling into the town. In 1834, there was another small outbreak where twenty-seven people died of cholera in this city together with another fourteen in the city of Huron. The prominent people who died included Sandusky’s first physician also the former mayor. A physician known as Dr. George Anderson, later on, died shortly after taking care of some of the cholera victims. In 1849 again another cholera attack took place in Sandusky, and it was extreme. Apart from Sandusky, it affected even Cleveland and Cincinnati which reported high rates. Sadly, Sandusky did not evade the disease on June 25 when a traveller from Cincinnati going through Mad River-Lake Erie Railroad turned out to be sick with cholera although he recovered.v Contrary to this situation, on July 2 of the same year, another woman residing next to the Mad River Depot died from this …show more content…
The germ was routinely killed during cold winters. Sadly, there was no more effective treatment for this disease during the period before the American civil war. In fact, the treatment that was available was as worse as the illness itself. This medical treatment ensured the death of individuals rather than making them better. In fact, the scientifically accepted explanation of cholera was that this disease was an airborne pathogen. People were made to believe that by just breathing in the poison from stagnant waters, dirty streets or from corpses they could not contract the illness. The doctors even increased the effects of the condition through this treatment. The doctors thought that the best way to treat the victims was through purging it from the body. They induced the loss of body fluids which speeded up dehydration of the patients thus killing them. This showed that the doctors did not know how to cure it. What the doctors prescribed for the patients, mostly was calomel. Calomel contained mostly mercury and several people died from mercury poisoning or even suffered other different negative effects from using this drug. However, evidence showed that not everyone believed in this airborne theory of cholera. John Lea, a gardener, founded the geography theory of cholera. He did not understand this existing theory and instead thought that cholera was because of minerals and natural salts in water. According to

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