Chinese Family's Role In The Chinese Ethnic Family

2050 Words 9 Pages
Despite the “generation gap” and the strain on family relations this may cause, Chinese families manage this gap through the cultural and social structures in which they are embedded. Zhou explains how Chinese children continue to perform within their parent’s expectations as a result of their “involvement in the Chinese ethnic community” (2011: 479). The fact that many Chinese immigrant families live in cities and suburbs with a large concentration of Chinese individuals allows these ethnic cultural values to persist. The ethnic institutions, as Zhou labels them, present in these communities prioritizes the needs of these children by providing a rigorous academic agenda, increasing access to tutoring, and encouraging Chinese language schools, …show more content…
As college graduates themselves, the parents want their children to complete an education beyond a bachelor’s degree at prestigious universities. However, these parents see college not as an opportunity to establish a career, but rather an opportunity for their children to explore their own interests. Overall, most middle class and professional parents value their child’s happiness over their career choice and are willing to help support their children until they find a fulfilling lifestyle. For example, Carol, a middle-class mother explains how she wants her children to find their passion, a specific type of career choice is less important to her (Nelson 2010). In conclusion, the obligations of parents who see themselves as nurturers for their children are shaped by their economic positions in society. Because they come from a position of wealth, they have the time, resources, and money necessary to focus on their child’s happiness rather than their sole survival in society. In contrast, working class parents who can only provide their children with the bare essentials hopes that their child will attend any college, graduate, and find a career that will allows them to care for themselves; these children must learn to advance quickly in order to survive …show more content…
As opposed to fatherhood, motherhood is associated with lower earnings and less prestigious careers because of the high demands women face upon having children and the stigma attached to motherhood. In their work, Mason and Eckman explain how mothers are placed on the “mommy track” where they settle for second-tier jobs in their profession that provide security, flexibility, and great benefits, even though women continue to enter fields in medicine, education, or law (2007). Examples of second-tier jobs include lecturing at a university, being a pediatrician, a lab assistant, or being a part-time psychologist. Women find themselves in these careers where it is difficult to advance into higher positions. Mason and Eckman explain how men are more likely to reach the highest positions in their professions because parenthood does not affect their careers. In fact, being a father could increase their desirability in the workforce as, “fatherhood is considered a mark of maturity” (2007:

Related Documents