Chinese Cultural Revolution Analysis

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Assess the social and political effects of the Cultural Revolution on China based on Mao Zedong’s aim

The Cultural Revolution (1966~1976) was a sociopolitical movement that was both ideological and political in nature. It was seen as a rectification movement that sought to remold the values and ideas of society and to create a new vision for China. Mao Zedong, the Chairman of the Communist Party of China, was determined to prevent the rebirth of the bureaucratic class and its practice of careerism. He also aimed to purge China of its old traditional ideas to solidify his position as the Chairman of the Cultural Revolution after his power weakened from the Great Leap Forward (1958~1962). The Great Leap Forward (1958~1962) was a period in China
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Many ordinary people farmed, while others mined or smelted coal and iron ore. As a result of the extensive farming and industrial work, steel production dramatically increased and several structures such as roads and hospitals improved the lives of the Chinese people. Despite the great effort during this period, the Great Leap Forward had failed as the workers in the industries were common ordinary people who had no expertise in machines which led to a lot of useless iron being made. Furthermore, as many as 30 million people died as a result of famine and impoverished conditions. The failure of this period led to Mao Zedong being dismissed from his rank as the State Chairman of RPC, although he still kept his title as the Chairman of the CCP. In order to combat economic disorder caused by the Great Leap Program, Liu Shaoqi attained his rank as the new Chairman of RPC while Deng Xiaoping became the CPC General Secretary. In order to reassert his authority after the failure of the Great Leap Forward, Mao Zedong seeked to have elements of Chinese culture and identity destroyed during the Cultural Revolution to create a new culture, which was very unsuccessful as it had only distorted China both …show more content…
Towards the 1960s, China was at its peak of political disorder due to the extreme tension between the Red Guards and PLA. Industrial progress had heavily declined and many education facilities were closed. A conspicuous factor in the decline of industrial progress was the heavy disputes taking place in mines and factories involving many youths and workers. Transportation of agricultural goods were also halted due to the need of trucks for the Red Guards to travel on. All of this economic disorder caused by the hectic political situation during this time also went alongside with the conflicts that were happening inside many factories. Several members from revolutionary teams gained authority over factories despite the fact that they had no expertise in industries which factored in the decline of industrial growth. Moreover, there was a shortage of people working in the technology and medical fields as they were relocated to rural areas to engage in strenuous labor which factored in the 14 percent decline in industrial growth in 1967. Although stability was reestablished when industrial progress began to increase in 1969, industries still suffered throughout the 1970s as more materials for agriculture and variety in industries were greatly needed. In the face of unstable political events, economic progress had

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