China Threat Analysis

Great Essays
Does China represent a threat or opportunity to Australia? Discuss in relation to trade and security

The rise of China has sparked renewed public and political interest in Australia’s foreign policy. As an engine of the world economy, China has elevated Australia’s trade market and has influenced Australia’s economic stability through the export demands of China and its bilateral agreements. Additionally, Australia’s involvement with China impacts its security environment. This essay will consider the influence of Australia’s relationship with China on trade and security prospects. Exploration of Australia’s trade relations with China will concentrate on an analysis the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement (ChAFTA). This discussion will
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Its economic growth has been exceptionally fast with expeditious rates of gross domestic product growth . Alongside its economy, it is conjointly a major political and military force. China’s expanding military power and security had been fuelled by acquisition of advanced foreign weapons, continued high rates of investment in its domestic defence and technology industries, and armed forces reforms. The People’s Liberation Army of China has transformed from a mass army to one that is capable of winning fierce conflicts against highly capable opponents . The Chinese Communist Party who maintains power monopolizes China’s political system. The viability of China’s current system is questioned by political analysts due to its structure of party above the law and its constraints on civil society and rights such as freedom of speech . However, the growth of one of the biggest countries in the world has become a significant political concern. China has modelled its development on “a combination of modernization of state-led economic organization and regulation with a gradual, controlled neo-liberalization in which foreign transnational companies play a central role” . It is unclear as to where China’s rise will lead and its vast development has fostered a threat to current dominant powers and has altered relationships with debatable middle powers such as Australia. Broadly, it is critical to consider that the …show more content…
Even more so in recent years, Australia has become a retreat for Chinese migrants who have integrated themselves as a dominant minority within the Australian community. Economic relations have long prospered in modern history however political and military ties have remained controversial under different Australian governments. Australia saw China as a mighty power in the Asia-Pacific region and established growing ties and a closer relationship with China under the Rudd Government. The Gillard/Rudd Government promoted its economic relations with China but looked to the United States for security based on common western values. Australia’s relationship with China has taken a new turn under the Abbott Government. Prime Minister Abbott who attempts to balance the trade relations of China and its security alliance with the

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