Children Witnessing Domestic Violence

1049 Words 5 Pages
Kelly Richards (2011) describes and examines the issue of children 's exposure to domestic violence. It is discussed that children in Australia and internationally are increasingly witnessing violent behaviour between parents, which is now being considered as a form of child abuse. Richards (2011), further outlines and compares the stereotypical view to research literature in regard to how children “witnessing” domestic violence is defined. It was found that from a stereotypical view children witnessing domestic violence is a child simply observing a fight either physical or verbal between parents. However, in contrast research literature presents that a child witnessing domestic violence involves a wide range of incidents, for example …show more content…
I found several statements as well as statistics to be extremely confronting. For example, Richards (2011, p. 2) states that it was found in a Personal Safety Survey released in 2005, that 59 percent of women who reported domestic violence admitted that the behaviour had been witnessed by children. Reading this statistic and others of a similar nature, confronted me not only in relation to domestic violence in general but also the seriousness of the issue and the high percentage of children being exposed. I have never had any extensive knowledge in regard to domestic violence prior to reading this article, or have been aware of the high rates of domestic violence, as well as the severe effects it can have not only on adults but also children. Although I acknowledge what the article says and can resonate with the thought that domestic violence exposure to children is harmful, I still found it challenging to read the several long and short term effects on children that Richards (2011) expands on. Within Richards (2011) writing I found there was heavy focus on the impacts and made me question the reasons as to …show more content…
Geffner et al. (2014) also outline the effects of family violence including psychological and behavioural impacts which are congruent to Richards (2011). However within the chapter Geffner et al. (2014) underpin multiple theoretical perspectives as to why children being exposed to inter-parental violence are at risk. Theories such as social learning theory, which suggests that children who are exposed to violence may not develop appropriate ways of dealing with conflict. As well as family systems theory which refers to children being in a dysfunctional family environment may impact the outcomes of children growing up to live in a violent family themselves, and also attachment theory where early violent experiences can impact on the child’s life trajectory. According to Geffner et al. (2014), these are all considered to be essential theories to be aware of when reviewing and assessing children 's exposure to domestic

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